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~ Catcher, Stella Rose and the Dead Language, Shallowhalo – Elsewhere – Zone One Mon 25 Apr, 8:00 PM New York

Elsewhere is a community that values inclusivity, joy, and creativity. In order to make this space accessible for everyone, we operate a strict zero-tolerance policy for harassment, discrimination, or hate of any kind. In order for you to join us, we require a US Government issued ID or foreign passport for admission! Please keep in mind that ticket sales are final, with the exception of a cancellation.

Please note that during this difficult time, our first priority is the safety of our community – before buying your ticket and planning your visit, please be sure to read our COVID-19 policies at http://bit.ly/elsewheresafety.

~ A Field of Vision: An Interview With Nancy Burson

The Face Of Global Carbon Emissions, 2022

To coincide with Nancy Burson’s recent NFT drop with Lobus, we decided to take a look into her cutting edge practice. Burson is no stranger to the intersection of technology and art. By the mid-1980’s Burson was known as the pioneer of facial morphing, ironically challenging the notion of photographic truth at the birth of digital manipulation. She has been interested in the interaction of art and science since the inception of her career as an artist and her work has been included in museums all over the globe: MoMA, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney, Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Centre Pompidou in Paris, LACMA, SFMOMA, Smithsonian Museum in Washington DC, amongst many others.

Burson’s Inaugural NFT The Face Of Global Carbon Emissions, is up for sale on Earth Day, April 22. This NFT is composed of the top five heads of state of the countries most responsible for global warming. The composite image is weighted to reflect the approximate percentages of each countries’ carbon emission contributions to our global climate crisis. China (Xi Jinping), US (Joe Biden), India (Narendra Modi), Russia (Vladimir Putin), and Japan (Fumio Kishida). A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Clean Air Task Force.

These NFTs will be minted on Polygon.

We had Brittany Adames interview artist Nancy Burson over the weekend to discuss her artwork and upcoming NFT piece.

A lot of your pioneering work is about the digital manipulation of the human face. What inspires this apparatus? 

When I first moved to New York in ‘68, the first exhibition and first museum that I went to was MoMA. They had an exhibition called The Machine as Seen at the End of the Mechanical Age, and when I walked in, the things that I related to the most were the things that were interactive.

I had these ideas that maybe the way to go for my work would be to do things that were interactive because I thought it was fun. I went to a nonprofit called Experiments in Art and Technology, which was Robert Rauschenberg’s organization, and they paired artists and engineers together. That was around ‘68 or ‘69, and they were new but were really great about finding [an engineer] for me who would be just the right person. This was very, very early in computer graphics. I went to see [the engineer], and he showed me a stylist, a pen, and a pad, and I thought: Why would I use that if I could use a pencil?

I then had an idea to create a machine to show people how they would look older. I asked him how we could do this, and he said he’d have to wait for the technology to catch up. He told me at a certain point—I guess this was around ‘76—that I should contact a Nicholas Negroponte at MIT. He worked for what was then called the Architecture of Machine Group, now called the Media Lab. It was a year when you can exactly pick up the phone and actually reach important people. Nicholas was crazy about the idea of doing this project. They had something that was one of the first digitizers. There was basically a camera on a copy stand attached to a computer, and we would put people under there for five minutes to scan their face, telling them to blink. This was the start of being able to digitize the human face—in just five minutes.

How do you structure your art process? 

I feel like my source is what I’m doing, so in other words, the ideas aren’t really coming from me. I kind of follow instructions to a point, and it’s very complicated when you hear what to do. Everything in my work is attempting to show people how to see differently. I haven’t strayed from [this motive], but I think there hasn’t been a greater mission in my life that hasn’t been fulfilled yet, and that’s what I’d like to do. I did some public performances from 2006 to 2011 all over United States and through England—and even one at the UN—and those performances allowed people to see energy and to see what I do. It’s not that there’s any difference between what goes in space and what goes on around humans. It’s a very beautiful, bright world, and I think I’m here to introduce people to it.

What medium do you find yourself most drawn to recently?

I’ve been doing a lot of painting. I was a painter in college and always wanted to continue it, but there had to be a really good reason, mainly because I really considered myself a conceptual artist. I kept wondering for years what to paint, and then in the late 70s, I had some ideas about painting—they were afterimages that I saw in different light sources. They were very dark and a couple of them were in my retrospective at Grey Art Gallery in 2002. I really like those, but they’re very hard to see; they’re oil painted black on glass. They’re beautiful but subtle, like afterimages themselves.

I remember going to a couple of friends’ studios and asking them if I could just watch to figure out what I’m meant to do. And so I picked good artists to go to. I started painting five or six years ago again, and they were paintings made from words; I started painting and drawing both handed. I would draw over and over again the word “love” or “I love you” or even things like “success” or even a whole series of paintings I did called Time Is Nothing But a Rhyme. Those are paintings that are abstract but they’re only marked by the words repeating. 

Several years ago, I started studying quantum physics, which for me is about quantum entanglement, which seems to be an expression floating around the art world these days. It’s interesting to me because when I see energy, it has to do with how I see energy. Quantum entanglement was something that I didn’t particularly understand: It’s really about two particles interacting. As physicists have found, the two particles can be very close to each other, or they can be half a world away, but they’re still communicating. For me, it’s kind of a hint that the world we are living in is really about determinism and acting as some sort of matrix that many physicists believe we’re in. I believe that’s the truth behind human existence and I’ve used my art to document the evidence of that. These paintings are actually made up of tiny sets of eyes, because for me the universe both watches and sees. The paintings on the videos are pulsing, and I’ve recorded a bunch of them as a living representation of quantum entanglement. It would be great to do some sort of an interactive installation with the paintings in the future. 

How do you see your techniques and/or modes of intrigue shifting with each new project? Or is it mostly all in alignment?

For me, it’s really all in alignment. I hear what to do, and so that’s how I understand, at this point, where my ideas are coming from. I have guidance and am clairvoyant, and so these are the tools that I’ve used to access my ideas. By the 90s, things were very clear about what I needed to do and how to do it. I really think that everything an artist does and that everyone does, in fact, is destiny. I believe in scripts, but in any case, that’s just my belief.

A lot of your work like the Human Race Machine, “There’s No Gene For Race” billboard, and other public artworks serve to speak of diversity as an integral way of life.  How do you conceptualize global unity through these varying mediums of art? What does global unity look like energetically?

What global unity looks energetically is that many other people are capable of seeing what I do. When you see what I do, then it changes your perception of faith and what faith is, and what God and/or the universe is. 

Nancy Burson | First and Second Beauty Composites (1982/1982) | Artsy
First and Second Beauty Composites, 1982/1982
Silver prints on original mounts trimmed to edges
7 15/16 × 8 7/8 in
20.2 × 22.5 cm

How you are conceptualizing diversity in your most recent work?

I think it has to do, again, with seeing and seeing differently. That’s why I’m really keen on more work that has to do installations and paintings and things of that sort. I’d also love to make those kind of things into NFTs. I don’t even know the technology well enough to know how it would work, but I just will. 

In what ways do you see these evolving technologies enhancing and/or manipulating truth? Do you think there are limitations?

You know, tech is very complicated. I came into the tech world in all innocence, but what I think is shocking to me now is that there’s people or companies who you can buy faces from to sell products on your website. This is not something I ever imagined. And even my relationship with AI and identity and everything that’s been done in terms of law enforcement was not also something that I ever really imagined.. Maybe I should’ve—I don’t know, but I wasn’t thinking like that. What we were thinking is that we got this technology down, we could make movies with actors. It was very early, and we even had a version of Snapchat with an interactive, cumbersome setup we called photomakers. Photomakers lived and died one year in the 80s. It was used on Valentine’s Day at a mall in Staten Island so people could put their faces on hearts. We also had more imaginative backgrounds where you can become the Mona Lisa or Statue of Liberty. 

And how is today’s technology impacting your art right now?

I think energies are fascinating. It’s an opportunity for people who don’t know my work to collect it in a certain way in a whole different community. I think it’s great—it opens up possibilities for artists and I also think this was a totally appropriate place for me to land because it is about artist ownership. It’s really important for the artist to continually reap awards for their ideas.

How do you cultivate your audience?

I’m really open to speaking through any platform that I can; I’m new to the platform and it’s a new language for me that I’m not as familiar as I’d like to be. Everyone’s very young and dynamic, and they’ve got it down, so all I can do is learn from the experts. I really wanted to put The Face of Global Carbon Emissions out there because I think it’s a great way to put a human face on the problem. It’s five different men  and it’s weighted to the approximate percentages of each country’s carbon emissions. First is China (Xi Jinping), which has twice as many as anyone else; the United States (Joe Biden); India (Narendra Modi); then Russia (Vladimir Putin). This is humanity’s biggest problem, and I think at this point people do understand how severe and serious it is, but it’s not getting anywhere.  

I hear you’ve created an NFT that’s being released on Earth Day. Can you talk more about it?

It would be great to see the humans get out there, see it, and think about it. We’ve got to get together, and we’re not it. That’s where Lobus comes in. It’s an artist ownership platform, and you can see the morphing as it is now.

In 2018, TIME published your thoughtfully compelling composite image “Trumputin” as their cover. Can you speak about the political interface of your artwork?

The Helsinki summit in mid-July 2018 was the first time that we really understood that Trump was in Putin’s pocket; it was an unbelievable moment where suddenly we had a president who was undoubtedly in alignment with a dictator. How could this be happening? [The cover] was kind of an answer to that moment in time.

I see morphing in a different way. I don’t do it that often anymore; I really only do it because there’s a good reason for it, but mostly I feel that behind me in the pocket of physicists, where my studies are. I really don’t believe humanity is responsible for any of the problems that we’re having right now. I do believe that there’s an intelligent matrix that’s always controlled humanity and that’s what I hear and what I see. And for me, seeing has always been believing. I always see a lot of energy around people, and I see it very clearly, so I just don’t think we’re responsible. Humans were born with mirror neurons—our empathetic source that’s place in our brains. I don’t see it anywhere right now. People are wondering what’s going on and I keep saying: People are not responsible. I just hope that there’s a time that it stops and that we move on. 

The cover for the July 30, 2018 issue of TIME Magazine

What are you working on right now? Where can our readers see, hear, or read you? 

I did an interview last year with Bill Hunt at PhotoLondon. There’s a new site called The Truth in Photography, who I wrote an article for them about Quantam Entanglement. 

There was a whole series of images that I painted and worked through, so there’s drawing and painting, and those I think will be my next NFTs. I’m trying to find a way to have a broader spectrum of visibility. There’s a documentary filmmaker making a short film about my work, which will be shot soon, so I’m hoping that becomes a bigger film. It will come out sometime this year. If it’s meant to get out there, then it’ll get out there.

About Brittany Adames:

Brittany Adames is a Dominican-American writer. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and featured in Palette Poetry, Up the Staircase Quarterly, Cosmonauts Avenue, Rust+Moth, TRACK//FOUR, and elsewhere. She is an MFA candidate in poetry at Brooklyn College.

~ 4WD – Tenant Worker People Power

Gentrification and rich pandemic migrants are pushing the local residents out of legacy neighborhoods transforming the city in an awful amusement park for the riches with no soul. You can support purchasing a tee for this year amazing collaborators Alaska-Alaska, Cali Thornhill Dewitt, Carrie Munden/Cassette Playa, Daniel Arsham and Partners&Others on 4worthdoing.com

“Miami Workers Center (MWC), founded in 1999, is a membership-based organization that builds power with tenants, low-wage workers, women and families. Through leadership development and grassroots campaigns, MWC is fighting for a Miami where everyone has access to a home and dignity on the job”

4worthdoing.com

~ Serving the People Tours Public Records

Public Records is a music-driven restaurant, performance, and community space built within the historic former ASPCA Headquarters on the tip of Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal. We are entirely vegan, maintain a plastic-free operation, and champion diverse peoples and scenes through both our artistic and cultural programming.

https://publicrecords.nyc/

~ Angel Song by Lilian Sumner

https://storage.googleapis.com/projects-assets/angel-song/angel_song.mp4

Lobus and filmmaker Lilian Sumner have teamed up to launch a Web3-based fundraising campaign for her upcoming short Angel Song. Using a crowdfunding smart contract on Ethereum, backers deposit ETH in exchange for $ANGELSONG tokens. The tokens serve as proof of patronage based on the backer’s fractional stake in the film.

Lobus’ collaboration with Sumner spotlights how Web3 technology can be harnessed to revolutionize creative industries. By providing financial incentives to film backers, such as fractional ownership and token economics, Lobus is introducing a new way to fund and monetize short films.

Angel Song is a short film that explores the traumatic imprint lost memories make and how one retrieves and comes to terms with them. Sunny, played by Isabella Anselmi, discovers a deeper layer of selfhood, a process which helps her and her imaginary friend let go of the past.

While the short zeros in on a pivotal moment in Sunny’s life, Sumner plans to develop the character more fully in her upcoming feature film Obliteration.

Angel Song will be minted as an NFT following its release. Using a smart contract, backers will receive payouts based on the amount of $ANGELSONG tokens they hold. $ANGELSONG tokens may also be used for governance over decisions like distribution and sale.

For more information please visit: https://www.lobus.io/angel-song

~ Support

Serving the People (STP) is a platform created by artists for artists.

Founded in 2017, STP has built a community of thousands through inclusive programming
and collaborations with brands including Woolrich, Converse, Adidas, Sneeze Magazine, and more.

Serving the People is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and we depend on the support of our community.

The easiest way to support STP is through SEEDS a NFT project launched to grant access and membership to its holders.

For more information on SEEDS visit https://seeds.lobus.io/.


Donations

For crypto donations please visit our Endaoment page.

For all other donations please click button below.

~ Sara Rabin for Woolrich by Serving the People

100% Cotton T-Shirt
Made in Japan
Printed by LQQK Studio

~ Fire Finder

Rick Rocha has directed a new film, FIRE FINDER, starring Lucien Smith. Watch Lucien do his very best to put out a fire.

Two hundred pairs of Adidas Forum Lows customized by Lucien will be available for sale June 10th at 2pm on our Shop.

Proceeds from the sale of the shoes will go towards the STP Creative Foundation to support our budding arts community. 

~ ‘Schac’

‘Schac’ was an alias used by Kai Schachter, a British-American artist (1997-2019). Like far too many others, Kai tragically took his life while battling mental illness. He used art as his primary vehicle of expression a lamentable posthumous revelation. Kai’s work dealt with the inner workings of his mind through humor, self-deprecation, meandering streams of consciousness, and meditative visual expressions like dew and rain. Given the prevalence of mental illness and the tragic consequences that Kai fell victim to, we want to use the artistic gifts he left us to establish a grant in his name. We hope this grant will give artists the platform to make new creations, something Kai loved doing more than anyone.’Schac’, in honor of Kai Schachter, will exhibit a suite of ten drawings he made from 2017-2019. For each of the drawings, we have created an edition of ten pristine reproductions available for purchase. This exhibition is the beginning of an ongoing not-for-profit mission in which grants will be awarded to artists: a cycle in which proceeds will fund the following group of selected artists. Works of art created by the awardees will be exhibited in a yearly exhibition, the proceeds of which will fuel the grant for the following class. The primary aim of this inaugural exhibition is to kickstart the grant. We are hopeful that our first exhibition will allow for a sustainable series in which the the grant can operate. 
Kai lived an electric life. He touched the lives of every person he met, always leaving a smile on their face. Kai’s social generosity and his support for the people around him is the inspiration of our project. Although he is no longer with us, we want to keep Kai’s short but bright legacy alive eternally.

Written by Adrian Schachter

Untitled Drawing 10 
5 3/4 x 7 1/2 in 
10 3/8 x 12 1/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 9 
5 1/2 x 3 5/8 in 
10 1/8 x 8 1/8 in 
C. 2017 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 8 
3 5/8 x 5 1/2 in 
8 1/8 x 10 1/8 in 
C. 2017 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 6 
3 5/8 x5 1/2 in 
8 1/8 x 10 1/8 in 
C. 2017 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 7 
4 1/8 x5 7/8 in 
8 3/4 x 11 5/8 in 
C. 2019 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 5 
2 3/8 x 51/8 in 
7 1/4 x 9 5/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 4 
5 3/4 x7 1/2 in 
10 3/8 x 12 1/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 3 
5 3/4 x7 1/2 in 
10 3/8 x 12 1/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 2 
4 1/8 x5 7/8 in 
8 3/8 x 10 1/2 in 
C. 2019 
Graphite on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 1 
5 3/4 x 7 3/8 in 
10 3/8 x12 1/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 

~ Mosaic Man by Jim Powers 

Mosaic Man 9
Mosaic Man 9
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2020
Mosaic Man 8
Mosaic Man 8
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2017
Mosaic Man 7
Mosaic Man 7
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2019
Mosaic Man 6
Mosaic Man 6
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2020
Mosaic Man 5
Mosaic Man 5
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2020
Mosaic Man 4
Mosaic Man 4
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2020
Mosaic Man 3
Mosaic Man 3
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2020
Mosaic Man 2
Mosaic Man 2
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2020
Mosaic Man 1
Mosaic Man 1
Jim Powers
Ceramic, Paint, Glass, Mosaic Tiles
1′ x 1′
2020

~ Westside Compost x Serving the People

Westside Compost co-founder Kaile’s Teramoto has a background in the fashion industry, and co-founder Stacy Huynh has been a longtime environmental activist. After bearing constant witness to the detrimental effects our quotidian lifestyles have on the planet, Kaile and Stacy teamed up to create Westside Compost, which serves to present a hands-on approach for change. Championing the concept of re-soiling, Serving the People partnered with Westside Compost to create this introduction to the Westside Compost project, with hopes that this collaboration will make their mission more approachable. Filmed by Jaxon Whittington, styled by Melissa Lim, and edited by Giselle Shiyen, this video provides an introduction to their initiative. More on Westside Compost:

California-based environmental initiative Westside Compost aims to push the needle forward on education and application of environmental practices in our everyday lives.

MISSION

By bringing accessibility into environmental education, Westside Compost aims to promote the values of re-soiling to help close the food waste cycle.

Re-soiling is a plan of action that replants nutritional soil in areas of the earth which have been degraded by human activity. By composting organic food materials, we can naturally break down food waste into soil and deposit into our own yards, potted plants, and parks. Compost is like gold when it comes to gardening; it provides a slow and steady release of natural nutrients while improving soil structure and retaining more water. 

When we strive to produce our own food, we cut back on corporate food production, pesticides, and food waste. Food waste that is not composted generally goes directly to a landfill, which then creates greenhouse gases that contribute to the heating of our planet.

FUTURE PROJECTS

To educate and invite others to participate in re-soiling, Westside Compost will offer a young adult informational guide with pages to log and track their individual composting process, small metal composting buckets for the kitchen and upcycled, branded t-shirts.

ABOUT THE FOUNDERS

Kaile Teramoto is co-founder of Westside Compost, where she is part of the core leadership team running strategic partnerships, editorial content, and R&D. She encompasses a depth of experience in sustainability and marketing while serving as co-founder and executive of Kaemi, an upcycling e-commerce store. While there, she led Kaemi to be one of the leading sustainable brands in Los Angeles, CA, building a consumer base in vast regions of the world including the United States, Amsterdam, and the United Kingdom. 

Stacy Huynh is co-founder of Westside Compost, where she is part of the core leadership team running business development, operations, and strategic partnerships. Stacy’s main focus is to help scale Westside Compost into a global initiative: influencing policies and lives throughout the world. Throughout her career, Stacy has committed to implementing ESG practices in the businesses she works with. She currently works full-time as Head of Operations at Arcadian Capital, a venture capital firm primarily focused on the ancillary sector of the cannabis industry. With her extensive experience in business development, fundraising, operations, and partnerships, Stacy will help the development of Westside Compost to gain attention on the global stage.

~ Group Show 3 – Curated by Lauryn-Ashley Vandyke and Ben Werther

The organization of the works featured in Group Show 3 serves to encourage viewers to investigate the relationship
between landscape and architecture in physical and digital space. We hope that the show illuminates the nuanced
ways in which the residue of memes and other digital ephemera and lingo seeps into the physical- linguistically,
visually, and design-wise. In 2021, we find that the architecture that resides amidst both the physical and digital landscapes oscillates between the two spaces.

Additionally, it was important for us to showcase a wide range of practices, ranging from the collaborative to the
individual, as Serving the People seeks to foster community and collaboration. The inclusion of various mediums,
themes, and processes allow us to materialize the untethered nature of digital participation and implant the objectives of Serving the People’s non-profit online community into the Pegasus Prints gallery space.

Untitled I
Untitled I
Andres Salamanca and Lauren Woods
Cardboard, Custom Trading Cards.
5.5 x 5.5 x 18 inches
2021
Untitled II
Untitled II
Andres Salamanca and Lauren Woods
Cardboard, Custom Trading Cards
9.5 x 5 x 11.5 inches
2021
Where Was The Walrus When The Whale Was Wasting Away I
Where Was The Walrus When The Whale Was Wasting Away I
Paige Labuda
C-type hand Prints framed in Acrylic
20 x 24 inches
2021
Where Was The Walrus When The Whale Was Wasting Away II
Where Was The Walrus When The Whale Was Wasting Away II
Paige Labuda
C-type hand Prints framed in Acrylic
20 x 24 inches
2021
FCKKDD (pages 75/76)
FCKKDD (pages 75/76)
Raafae Ghory
Woven Cotton
50 x 70 inches
2021
Munch A Bunch of Fritos While Watching The Fault in Our Stars by Yourself
Munch A Bunch of Fritos While Watching The Fault in Our Stars by Yourself
Titus Mcbeath
Electronic components and video
3 x 4 x 1.75 inches
2021
Ophanim Quilt
Ophanim Quilt
Isabella Norris
polyester, dye, and batting
76 x 50 inches
2021
Karen is a pejorative term for a woman seeming to be entitled or demanding beyond the scope of what is normal...
Karen is a pejorative term for a woman seeming to be entitled or demanding beyond the scope of what is normal…
Lucien Smith
Acrylic paint and silkscreen ink on canvas
35 1/3 x 23 3/4 inches
2020
Jack's Ladder
Jack’s Ladder
Two Dogs and A Leash
Archival Print on acrylic, Aluminum Backing
40.5 x 59 inches
2021

~ What to Get Your Date for Valentine’s Day

Click the images to check out the jewelry store’s shop!

We love Carol Li, we love freshwater pearls, and whether your Valentine is just a friend or they’re more than that, they’ll love a Janky Jewels friendship bracelet.

Mouth jewelry is in-but-still-niche, and if your date is down to be a year ahead of the trend they’ll loveee this gift. This one is for the tooth gem lover, the girl who regrets letting her medusa piercing close up, or the one who wants a face piercing but can’t bring herself to do it. We’re pretty sure these mouth guards from Daemon Concept just latch onto your bottom lip, so you can just add it to the dish next to your apartment door: phone, keys, wallet, mask, mouth guard!

This is fairy-like but elevated, ornamental but not kitschy. We really, really love these Joanne Burke necklaces, and everything else she makes.

Oh, Harlot Hands. Harder to get your hands on than a Telfar bag, but if you pull up on her with some pearly handmade neck armor she won’t even be mad that you were a week late with the Valentine’s Day gift!

It is just incredibly goated to have this on your bedside table. If your Valentine’s date takes more than one pill a day, or even just a double dose of multivitamins to keep their immune system straight, pull up on them with a Rebekah Bide pill holder, or any of her other cute, less functional jewelry pieces.

“I walk a mile for your smile, it’s embarrassing” – Hex by Bladee 

If Bladee is her favorite rapper she’ll automatically look cute as hell in these dagger earrings by Emma Pryde.

We scrapped the joke about how yeahitsjewelry makes jewelry for centrists, but really, you gotta be a pretty classy lady for this. Leftists can be very classy too! Regardless of your date’s political beliefs, getting your date a yeahitsjewelry charm will excite her just as much as the first episode of the new season of Gossip Girl will.

~ Among Us: Zombie Formalism in the Recent Social and Political Reboots

Among Us: Zombie Formalism in the Recent Social and Political Reboots

They say gossip rots your brain, and they’re absolutely right. But, what if rotting your brain is useful? There’s a common thread of last week’s drama; things just keep coming back to life. As if being in disguise, dead eras come back with a secret vengeance – to subtly remediate old content and dismantle past forms so that they can be bricolaged in the present. If ‘formal’ refers to the mimesis of past forms, then it’s ‘zombielike’ when past media and political agendas are retrofitted for current tastes. Under this metaphor, elements of the new social-political shifts can be described in terms of Walter Robinson’s 2014 art term Zombie Formalism. A phrase mutilated in past years, zombie formalism is not limited to resurrections, but also questions whether remediation is merely propaganda wearing a funny hat and mustache. Isn’t remediating what early Perez Hilton did with gossip tabloids, and what I’m trying to do with pop culture news roughly 15 years later? Is post-modern resurrection useless in its mimesis, or genius in its recontextualization? For this weeks news, we’re going to scoop up a bowl of brain stew and examine the undead media among us, 28 Days Later-style because lame zombies eat last.

If you follow US politics, or have any social media at all, you know that president-elect Joe Biden and vice-president Kamala Harris were inaugurated into the White House on January 20th. Understandably, there was quite a bit of Internet-hoopla, the most interesting of which being theTwitter hashtag #bidenerasedwomen. The hashtag, which hit critical mass in the hours following the ceremony, was full of commentary regarding Biden’s purported erasure of women- not in reference to certain womanizing allegations, but as a response to elements of a new Executive Order. The order details various human rights mandates, including a safeguard for trans people’s rights to participate in organized sports and use bathrooms that coincide with their gender identity. Some pockets of feminism crowded #bidenerasedwomen with concerns that embracing gender diversity in sports threatens their exclusionary conception of sex-based rights. An age-old question of sex, gender, and permission, this order is one of 17 directives Biden signed on his first day, elucidated here.

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One noted unkillable zombie emerged during the inauguration; that one damn Bernie Sanders meme. Admittedly, we love to watch the elite put on their stupid little outfits and perform their stupid little ceremonies, as evidenced by our reaction to Bernie Sanders’ off duty butcher from Vermont look. Other pathologized fashion moments from said elite include previously unbeknownst-to-us-until-someone-said-she-was-important poet-laureate Amanda Gorman, wearing full primary color Prada. Major points to her stylist for using a gorgeous candy-red satin headband as a giant elastic for Gorman’s box braid-bun. Miss Miucca Prada’s second line was worn by Ella Emhoff, the darling stepdaughter of Kamala Harris, whose Miu Miu coat gave us Bushwick-lesbian-with-secret-access-to-trust-fund energy. Paired with a Batsheva prairie dress and little round wire glasses, Emhoff delivered the wealthy Parsons student DIY aesthetic in a classic Americana flavor. Maybe her outfit owned fashion in a unique, cool-girl way, like the magazines are trying to let on, but maybe her look was just the perfect combination of recognizable, yet alluring fashion references which serves to reinvent, à la zombie formalism.

Since we’re on the topic of girls you’d think to bully at Mood Ring circa 2018, Tavi Gevinson and the Rookie Magazinegirlies are back in a big way. After its fold in 2018, Gevinson’s Rookie had effectively done its job. Geeky bunches of pre-teen girls grew into geekier girls with recurring Vice bylines, and young creatives were able to form a now-eponymous “collective” via Gevinson’s smol bean network, as seen in the Rookie Yearbook series. So why come back? For the sake of our favorite buzzword, community. Since denouncing her #girlboss title, Tavi Gevinson has missed the people, which is why it’s only fitting that Rookie’s return is in audio form in partnership with Audible and inspired by the earlier Rookie podcasts. The limited project contains episodes with Tavi’s never-ending collection of good homies who dole out advice on topics like self-care and communication skills. Nostalgia is all the rage! The internet needed its big sister back. We missed you, Tavi!

Speaking of nostalgia, Miss Gevinson is set to appear in the Gossip Girl reboot, premiering sometime this year on HBO Max. This juicy revamp will carry the same elements of our favorite teen dramas from the 2000’s, but with a twist. Think 20-somethings playing teenage high school students, with a grating overtone of “representation matters.” Here’s what we know: Gevinson plays cute Constance blonde named Kate Keller, while Canadian singer-songwriter Jordan Alexander plays Julien Calloway, rumored to be named after writer and beloved-by-STP influencer Caroline Calloway. Apart from the cast and basic plot, the new Gossip Girl is considered to be very “now” – Harper’s Bazaar harps (hehe) on the importance of diversity (reinforced by the cast haircuts), along with one key idea to ground the show- this time, we know who Gossip Girl is. Creator Josh Schwartz weaves millennial identity politics into the fabric of the new show, saying everyone will be Gossip Girl. Rather than coming from a single, mysterious blogger, Gossip Girl intel will be crowd-sourced from the Constance-St. Jude crew themselves. Elements of the OG Gossip Girl, such as the original costume designer, will make an appearance in this reboot, yet this time, the cast will be accessorized with a social media self-awareness that could only exist in this post-everything time. The new Constance dress code is formal(ism)-wear, sprinkled with a recontextualization that promises political correctness and the new season’s elevated Prada headbands

Prada headband in Season 4 Ep 1 of Sex and the City, aired June 3rd, 2001
Prada headband in Season 4 Ep 1 of Sex and the City aired June 3rd, 2001

Prada SS 2021 hair accessories are a formalist feat, and along with prophesizing the Sex in the City reboot, our renewed appreciation for Prada accessories can be linked back to our DNA memory of the outfit Carrie Bradshaw accessorized with the OG Prada headband back in the aughts. If the current obsession with early 2000s trends isn’t empirical evidence for our social disposition for what the Walter Robinson article described as a “simulacrum of originality,” then what is? HBO Max recently announced that Sex and the City is getting a facelift, sans Kim Cattrall. Since this news dropped last December, the rumor mill has been churning – what will come of the iconic Samantha Jones? Will her breast cancer relapse? Cattrall and Parker are alleged frenemies– will there be a fictional falling out between her, Carrie, Charlotte, and Miranda? Will Catrall and Parker’s real life beef roam throughout the new Sex and the City, hungry for brains? All we have is past form and a basic understanding of postmodernism to guide us on this one. And if you’re sick of reboots, you can hold onto hope that the critics were right about Zombie formalism, and that mixing old form with new fashion will plummet ratings before talks of season renewals even hit the table. 

Art imitates life, gossip anticipates time, and time imitates time, time and time again. What has happened before will happen again, inspired by how it happens now. When it comes to reboots of iconic shows, regurgitation of gossip and rumors, and readjustments throughout the executive branch of power, everything becomes and is becoming more and more self-referential. 

~ Wretched Light Industry

Wʀᴇᴛᴄʜᴇᴅ Lɪɢʜᴛ Iɴᴅᴜsᴛʀʏ has arrived on stp.world – a collaborative virtual world cobbled together in Scotland by @ueq__ & @darlingtonjay

The map of Eilean Fogg comprises 33 environments made by emerging digital artists, magicians, jammers, worlders and dreamers from all over our globe. Wander freely around our sunny isle; there might be mazes, offices, sea serpents, sheep, shrines, forests and more.

Hypercubes by Alfie Dwyer
I’m a multimedia artist, animator, and filmmaker. My work focuses on the human body, the digital world, and dark comedy. I’m also interested in new ways of looking at images, and new ways of looking at reality.
Website

Harris Isle by Alice Pool
I am an Artist from Sheffield, currently living in Glasgow. I studied at the Glasgow School of Art, and graduated in 2020, in the Department of Sculpture & Environmental Art. My current practice uses digital animation, I generate 3D computer images, in which I try to share an aesthetic experience. Building emotional and poetic worlds in the digital inevitably provokes me to explore people’s relationship to their own history and their perception of time, experience, and memory.
Website

Crying in the Chapel by Angus MacDonald
A recent graduate from the Glasgow School of Art, I am a multidisciplinary artist and musician working with installation, animation, and performance. In 2019 – March 2020 I was involved with Sonomama sessions, a monthly session of improvised performances and discussions at the CCA: Glasgow. Recently, I have been directing and animating a music video for This Is The Deep, a London based collective.
Website

Asks Air Silence (This Time, I’m Gonna Lose) by Anna Clegg
My practice revolves around ideas of embodiment, presence and memory as mediated by technology and the image. The body now only a semi-present state, constant access to media has allowed for a rift between embodied reality and a secondary, image-based existence to form, and a certain motion sickness ensues. Technology acts to heighten phenomena, allowing for the incarnation of extra information: lens flare, copy-paste, bicubic interpolation, slow motion, the solidification of smoke – rendered as heavy as the Pepsi bottle it cloaks. My paintings strive to mimic bodies of software whose intended purpose is to filter reallife phenomena; a voice thinned by autotune, an image veiled with copies of itself. Visual effects overlay media to signify a distancing in both space and time innate to memory, yet the mask is illusionary. The wet haze plaguing the remembered image in cinema, the reverb following dialogue like a ghost, seem to forget that memory has access to your body in a way most physical realities, save perhaps for invasive surgery, don’t. It exists inside the skin. Anna Clegg is a visual artist working with painting, photography, video and sound. She studied at Chelsea College of Arts, where she achieved a First Class Honours for BA Fine Art, and at Universität der Künste Berlin. In 2018 she won the £10,000 Painter-Stainers’ Company prize for painting, and won the Court Barn Bursary award in 2016. She lives and works in London.
Website

To Love Lock by Antonio Parker-Rees
I’ve always seen myself primarily as a painter. Although my practice extends across a range of mediums from digital model making to printed textiles, I aim to maintain painting’s sensibility throughout. The imagery and processes I use often deal with themes of desire, labour, attention and immediacy. Adopting relatively arbitrary motifs and imagery, my work tries to open space between purpose and affect, resulting in combinations which can feel antithetical and weird, even ghostly.
Website

00000000 by Ariel Helyes
Ariel Helyes is a London based artist working with video, sculpture and appropriation to address ideas of powerlessness, labour and finance. He is part of the conceptual creative agency Declined & Deceased. He graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2020. Recent exhibitions include 50/50 in Fold Gallery, London, When Grasshoppers Make their Great Leaps in Téte, Berlin and Attention Anticipation Anxiety Relief Release in Fitzrovia Gallery, London.
Website

Stuttered Heart by Bel Docherty
Bel Docherty is a freelance CGI artist currently based in Paris, using digital mediums for object, space and image creation. Recent graduate from The Glasgow School of Art with a BA (Hons) in Communication Design. Her work explores future potential design processes and the visualisation of scent and the culture that surrounds it. With experience in textiles and sculpture, her work researches the digital materiality of objects in aim to feel real and engaging, while communicating initially intangible and abstract ideas. Her design process takes visual reference from luxury fashion, technology advertising and contemporary graphic design in the venture to create clean, inventive graphics.
Website

Eyewitnessed Accounts by Benjamin Hall
I am an artist, animator, filmmaker, gamemaker and writer based in Glasgow, Scotland. My practice examines the fatalistic relationship between predictability and chaos, and their confusion, conflation and obfuscation by contemporary systems of digitised control. I recently graduated from BA Fine Art at the Glasgow School of Art, where I led DS2020 Simulator; a student project that recreated the cohort’s cancelled degree show as a free and accessible game. It featured the work of 136 affected graduates, and both DS2020 Simulator and I appeared on BBC One, BBC Radio Scotland, the List UK and more. My work has also appeared on the Piccadilly Circus billboard as part of CIRCA’s c. 20:20 series (2020), in the Wrong Biennale (2019/20), Visual Arts Scotland’s Graduate Showcase (2020), HomeBrew Digital Commissions (2020) and Digital Artist Residency (2020).
Website

Violet Inferno by Cat McClay and Éiméar McClay
Our collaborative work considers ideas of queerness, abjection and patriarchal systems of power and oppression through an interdisciplinary body of work comprising video, 3D models, installation and digital collage; it draws on and seeks to examine the historical narration of the queer body within heteronormative society. By amalgamating striking visuals, academic research, politics and references to popular culture, we aim to collapse hierarchies between high and low cultural material. We focus on the pervasive influence of Christianity, and the social expression of the normative values communicated by religious institutions. Expanding on this, we explore the influence that dominant cultural texts – including the bible – have over identity formation, focussing particularly on how they both shape and are shaped by societal attitudes.
Instagram

VG+b by Dexter Stokes-Mellor
My work focuses on cultural phenomenon like cinema and club culture with an added awareness of other contemporary artistic practices. ‘24x Psycho’ for example. Using Douglas Gordon’s ’24 Hour Psycho’ as a inspiration to create a new rendition of an already loved artwork. Or my work ‘I listen to Blue Monday every Monday’ that being almost meditative video piece on the worldwide impact and effect of club music, and specifically the effect of Blue Monday. More work re-contextualises already known phenomena and place the viewer into a position where they have no choice but to think of this phoneme in an entirely different light.
Website

unfolding by Enorê
Enorê is an artist from Rio de Janeiro currently based in London, where they have recently completed their MFA in Fine Arts at Goldsmiths. Their work revolves around the fluidity of digital media into physicality and back, the modes of translation and transcoding that arise from these dynamics and how that relates to ways in which the body itself mediates and processes information. They work in multiple media including, but not limited to, computer programming, 3D modelling, painting, ceramics and textile; and have recently exhibited with BBZ BLK BK, Circa Art Class of 2020 and NEoN Digital Arts.
Website

Salmonopticon 2025 by Finn Rabbitt Dove & Toby Mills
Salmonopticon 2025 follows the story of Sarah, a salmon farm worker, in a not too distant future where human systems of domestication have filtered down into the species they wish to domesticate. This mystery game builds on Prof. Marianne Lien’s chapter, ‘Unruly Appetites: Salmon Domestication “All the way down”’, to speculate human, salmon, cleaner fish and sea lice relations in the near future.
Finn’s Website
Toby’s Email

Cemetery of the Holy Doors by Hannah Lim & Hugo Harris
Hannah Lim and Hugo Harris combine their artistic practices in a series of collaborative pieces – joining Hugo’s sculptural work, which is primarily concerned with the human body and Hannah’s, which she uses to explore concepts of cultural identity through sculptural design. Digitising their physical sculptural work and line drawings through photogrammetry allows them to have conversations through software, sending work back and forth to one another, adding and manipulating the object with each ‘reply’.

The most recent architectural designs have been influenced by a series of classical style buildings from places that the pair have spent time together; Edinburgh, Florence and West London. Using photo scans as their building blocks Hugo has created structures inspired by such buildings, Hannah then continues the design process, incorporating features more characteristic of Chinese Imperial buildings along with colour. The finished structures blend elements of Western and Eastern architectural designs, enabling them to have a sculptural, digital dialogue through which they have been able to communicate their own artistic styles and interests to one another.
Hugo’s Website
Hannah’s Website

Whowle by Harriet Davey
Harriet Davey (She/Her) is a 3D Artist, Graphic Designer, and AR creator based across London and Berlin. Obsessed with questioning what it means to be fluid and human in a digital world: her work examines and interrogates the ugly and the beautiful; the maximum and the minimum; the online and the offline.
Instagram

Freefall II (Rethinking Ruderal Ecologies) by India Stanbra
Engaging with a world increasingly mediated by the presence of technology, my practice asks how our intimacy with the screen, and our relationship with the artificial might evolve and adapt in a posthuman context. Using 3D software to mimic and reconstruct moments from the everyday, my work explores the referential quality of digital imagery in its imitation of reality. I am interested in how the viewer encounters these simulated moments, speculatively exploring alternate modes of seeing and understanding.
Website

Into The Wild Blue Yonder: Part 1 by Jake Major
My work centres around an extraordinary curiosity towards the mountains of fictional and fantastical media that surrounds us all. Holding the belief that the endless heroic journeys taken by the icon’s of these imaginary worlds have been formative of my own identity and our culture at large, some time ago I assumed the alter ego of Don Quixote through my artistic practice. A maniacal nobleman, one who has lost their mind, endeavouring to revive the age of chivalry and heroism. Employing digital rendering software and video game engines, this virtual disguise allows me to insert myself into an unreal fantasy. To be a hero of my owncinemtaic universe and the master of my own video game land.
Website

Pine Processionary by Jay Darlington
Jay Darlington (22) is an artist based in Glasgow, Scotland, and a recent graduate from the Glasgow School of Art. Jay’s work aims to question the autonomy of virtual systems, doing so through the exploration of the barrier between our physical experience and the mythical powers of the signal-based information we digest: the internet, video games, and cinema. Through video installation and 3d printed/cast sculptural work, Jay focuses upon the idea that the virtual has locked us in a paradoxical state; we are seemingly stuck in an environment of hyper speed, yet in many ways lack any forward motion. Standstill.
Website

Take me lightly by Jazeel Ameen
Jazeel is currently in the midst of a storm figuring out how to accept/reject the non-affordances we aren’t vulnerable to as non-participants of the un-designed un-curated un-vetted experiences nervously hovering at the fringes of our lives. Currently working as an Experience Designer in the tech industry, the battle rages on as he attempts to advocate for interfaces which can hurt you unexpectedly (they’re trying to do their best!) and hopefully get you to cry yourself to sleep for abusing an elevator button. He was born and raised in Chennai and graduated with a Design degree from IDC School of Design, IIT Bombay.
Instagram

SOFT SANCTUARY OF MINE by Joe Jack Chapman & Luke Thompson
Uk based multidisciplinary artist whose work threads together speculative world building, digitally rendered matter, and physically archived material with the intention to broaden our ideas of companionship, playing and the cultivation of my own virtual ecosystem. Drawing reference from The Codex Seraphinianus, Satoshi Tajiri’s “Pocket Monsters”, Miyazaki’s fantasy worlds and organic occurrences in the nature. Each piece of work, whether a rendered animation, textile piece or inkjet print- expands upon this imagined ecosystem continuously, not driven by hardwired evolution but instead by digital experimentation.
Instagram

But I Have My Gossips! by Johanna Saunderson
Johanna Saunderson creates work that seeks to unearth intimacies between time, place and the more than human. Through moving image, sound and sculpture she builds environments that contain multiple perspectives and hold space for contradiction. Johanna is a 2020 graduate from Glasgow School of Art and currently participating in Wysing Arts Centre’s AMPlify residency, a learning programme using digital tools to create future visions of the world.
Website

sunrise/sunset/all the god time by Kate Frances Lingard
Kate Frances Lingard lives and works in Glasgow. At the moment, they are thinking about how to enact an ethics/politics of care within the digital commons. Working with digitally created images, objects, environments and playing around with programming, they hope to question systems that define how we act and live together. Recently, they have been working with friends and collaborators to discuss the possibilities and complexities of decentralised and distributed technologies as shared infrastructure. The work for Wretched Light Industry has stemmed from ideas of interdependency, reliance, exhaustion and illness using references to bodily systems as a way of understanding complex interconnectedness.
Website

Plinths by Luca Guarino
Luca Guarino is a multimedia artist based in Glasgow and Canterbury. In his work, he imagines unreal spaces where the interfaces and apathy of digital media pour into the physical world in ways that are at once seductive and uncanny, resulting in surreal works that invert images and objects’ relationships with each other and the viewer. This work is a meditation on an increasingly tactile digital media contesting the attention of the physical world and static image making.
Instagram

The Land of Everythingness by Niamh Lynch
Niamh Lynch uses situations found on Reddit relationship advice forums and builds upon them through scripts, monologues and fairy tales. A process notably similar to the growing trend of writing Fan Fiction online, something that allows people to project their own experiences or fantasies onto established fictional characters. A key influence on her writing is the melodrama found in Young Adult Fiction. By combining the desperation and longing expressed in this genre with the situations she finds on Reddit, Lynch moulds the existing scenarios into her own new narratives. The combination of real-life scenarios and melodramatic fiction blurs the lines of reality and fantasy, a distinction that is further blurred by the Reddit posts themselves, as there is no way to know if they are ‘real’ to begin with. In Lynch’s work there is no separation between humans and cartoons, with cartoon-like characters acting as vessels to explore complicated human relationships. These characters are disarmingly cute on the surface, with the childish aesthetic providing a thin veil to mask the sinister and melancholy subtext.
Website

Threshold by Nicholas Delap
Nicholas Delap is a Digital artist who explores wilderness, Post Humanism and re-wilding as themes within his artworks, creating immersive and other worldly virtual environments, sculptures and video installations. His work seeks to undermine the traditional boundaries between the Human, The Natural and the Technological.
Instagram

Shinkokyu by nenemu.lab (Aubrie, Yurike, Sorutie)
nenemu.lab is a diverse team of creatives based in Tokyo, Japan. Consisted of Aubrie (Visual Artist, Motion Designer), Yurike (Interaction Designer, Technical Specialist), Sorutie (Digital Designer, Illustrator), members are from Indonesia, Vietnam, and Singapore. We are young aspiring creators who use interactive media art as a contemplative platform to tell meaningful stories. Our narratives revolve around human nature, creating and opening up dialogues and perspectives on human vulnerabilities. The tools we utilize are unlimited: we play with 2D and 3D visuals, crafting, projection mapping, and any suitable materials and technologies. For us the journey of constant experimentation echoes with our creative growth individually and collectively.
Aubrie’s Website
Yurike’s Website
Sorutie’s Behance

In Love with the Radio-Man by Oma Keeling
Oma Keeling – Glasgow based artist and researcher. I work across mediums and am interested in the combination and glitches of the analogue and digital. My focus is on the boundaries of emotive communication, the language of games and play, and the difficulties of expression.
Website

Charging Bull by Rebecca Gill
Rebecca is based in Glasgow. Her research interests are currently centred around the distributive mechanisms of power in network politics and the means by which these structure social organisation in digital space. She has been writing and researching on value designation in digital spaces of knowledge production/ organisation, and the economic, social and political bases that influence the weight these values hold.
Instagram

PLANTAESICA-C. by Sade Arellano & Ark Audio
My practice shape-shifts between mediums across a network of digital alter-egos. In my work I attempt to investigate the collective experience of chronic human mortality bound in the matrix of advanced capitalism and technology, and attempt to deprogram and glitsch the mythology of dualisms (e.g Mind/Body, Organic/Synthetic, Digital/Physical, Internal/External). I do this through various forms of playing; I play with my food, with artificial intelligence, and language. My work and I exist mostly in the virtual plane, expanding and contracting around a constellation of digitally archived moments, histories and cultures. Both online and offline I create visuals, objects and sounds, and spaces that evoke a range of unfamiliar human emotions such as apprehensive happiness, ecstatic disgust, giddy confusion and existential lust.
Website

genesis glade by Salvi de Sena
Working primarily within 3D animation, sound and text; Salvi De Sena (b. 1998, Somerset) is curiously preoccupied with the enigmatic qualities of the physical elements through which we live. In his work, the geological strata beneath one’s feet and the charged atmospheres above become the imprint surfaces of unseen pasts and strange enmeshments of bodies and landscapes — melted whisper music of ethereal origins; dusts of primeval formations and creatures; and fossilised moments of queer desire manifest themselves materially and rise up to the surface of perception.
Website

European Pastoral Landscape with Citizen by Sean Robertson
Sean Robertson is an interdisciplinary artist interested in the manufacturing of social narrative and essence, investigating the construction of character through flesh, proxy, and dystopian universalities. Working across video, simulation, animation, installation, painting, and etching, he is increasingly pursuing collaborative performance works utilising new media.
Website

TOO GUILTY by Soorin Shin
I am Soorin Shin, not yet a cyborg, rather an analogue human celebrating the digital age. Feminism, racial discussions and environmental issues are integral to my practice. It takes its forms in digital and physical shapes: sculpture, installation, performance, graphic art, moving images, 3D modelling and 3D printing.
Website

PHOSPHENE (DAY)DREAMS by Tasha Lizak

Tasha Lizak,(b. 1996), is a visual artist who lives and works in Glasgow. She graduated from the Glasgow School of Art in 2019, where she studied Sculpture and Environmental Art. Working across digital moving image, she endorses 3D softwares to construct spaces that are then used in videos, paintings, and prints, creating a network of works that are inherently intertwined. Interested in our contemporary ecology; an hallucinatory entanglement of multiple realms, logics, systems and ideas, her practice navigates through themes of the supernatural in coherence with our saturated digital culture. Since graduating she has been part of group shows at DeFormal Gallery (New York), Outpost Gallery (Norwich), and was selected for the Scottish Sculpture Workshop Graduate Award Residency (Lumsden).
Instagram

The oracle by Zach Beech
Zach Beech is a London-based visual artist and filmmaker. Working primarily in video and image making, his work uses a mixture of digital collage and 3d animation. Beech delivers his aesthetic of stylised photorealism through the use of real time graphics powered by game engines, and touches on themes of fantasy, political irony and the gamification of everyday life.
Instagram