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~ Armando Nin & the “Sham-Shows”.. frame #1

Today I woke up in odd mood and decided to release one image from my “Sham-Show” collection. None of these copies ever touched the internet. There are a total of six endorsements that are more humorous than the last and I’ll feature on STP every so often, with more context perhaps (even though its self explanatory). Each were a public announcement that I considered as a hoax but the undertaking was evident. Each bulletin was commercially exhibited near each gallery/institution and received no true consequence.

~ Freedom From The Endless Cycle Of Personal Reincarnations

I am so excited to put on my third solo exhibition held at THE END Project Space this May 2022.

Evolving from the body sized band t-shirt paintings I started making in 2020, I will paint a movie screen sized mural version directly onto the gallery wall.

Over the past year, it’s been a joy to collaborate with the space’s founder and operator Craig Drennen. Thank you, Craig, for the space to show my paintings, and an opportunity to work big.

I’m looking forward to it!

THE END Project Space
1870 Murphy Avenue SW, Atlanta, GA 30310
Opening Reception: Friday May 6, 6PM – 9PM
Gallery Hours: Friday and Saturday 12PM – 4PM and by appointment
Contact: acdrennen@gmail.com

Follow @the_end_project_space

~ Armando Visits art. #1

As you know, I systematically drop in museums and art galleries in New York City. It’s very entertaining and also, in some way, I get to imitate the act of “falling in love”.

In the past, There has been countless times where I didn’t enjoy the work but I went with intentions are to sit with and appreciate the art. At this moment, these are my recent visits and favorites (in no particular order) in the lower Manhattan area:

Ryan Foerster at Martos Gallery
Jane Dickson at James Fuentes
Lukas Quietzszch at Ramiken
Jake Manning at TIf Sigfrids
David Worjarowicz at P.P.O.W
Nora Torato at 52 Walker
Mary Manning at Canada
Emily Weiner at Brackett Creek Exhibitions

I will be visiting more galleries in the next few days and will keep you all in the loop!

Hope to see you at an opening! Thanks!

~ What Is Left Unspoken, Love

Is love intrinsic, or is it a habit? What is the difference between love and friendship? What is the relationship of love to truth, freedom, and justice? These are just some of the questions to be explored in What Is Left Unspoken, Love, a thirty-year survey of contemporary art featuring artworks that address the different ways the most important thing in life—love—is expressed.

Organized during a time of social and political discord, when cynicism often seems to triumph over hope, this exhibition will examine love as a profound subject of critical commentary from time immemorial yet with a persistently elusive definition. As poet and painter Etel Adnan wrote, love is “not to be described, it is to be lived.”

What Is left Unspoken will feature nearly seventy works, including paintings, sculpture, photography, video and media art, by more than thirty-five international artists based in North America, Europe, and Asia. Artists include Ghada Amer, Rina Banerjee, Thomas Barger, Patty Chang, Susanna Coffey, James Drake, Keith Edmier and Farrah Fawcett, Alanna Fields, Dara Friedman, Andrea Galvani, General Idea, Jeffrey Gibson, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Kahlil Robert Irving, Tomashi Jackson, María de los Angeles Rodríguez Jiménez, Rashid Johnson, Gerald Lovell, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Kerry James Marshall, Felicita Felli Maynard, Wangechi Mutu, Ebony G. Patterson, Paul Pfeiffer, Magnus Plessen, Gabriel Rico, Dario Robleto, RongRong&inri, Michelle Stuart, Vivian Suter, Jana Vander-Lee, Carrie Mae Weems, Akram Zaatari

at The High Museum (Atlanta) on view March 25 – August 14, 2022

Gerald Lovell – Friendship Tower, 2021. Oil on panel, 96 x 48 inches.

~ A Long Walk by Liv Pancheri

As a group, the abstractions of these visual and audio works address the rose-colored sensations one falls into on a long walk. Like one can get lost in their own thoughts, one can get lost in the artwork and music. As the title insinuates, this show is not meant for quick viewing. These works are slow burns; the longer your eyes and ears fixate upon them, the more details come forth.

Serving The People · A Long Walk
Red Moon
Agostina Gho
2019
Oil on paper
5″x7″
Pollen Brush
Liv Pancheri
2020
Watercolor and Guoache on Paper
8″x6″
Green Walls
Liv Pancheri
2020
Watercolor and Glass Paint on Paper
6″x8″
Eternal Flow
Taj Poscé
2018
Mixed Media on Wood Panel
36″x36″
Walks in Autumn
Janet Mcgillis
2020
Tempera, Oil, Acrylic, and Mixed Media on Canvas
48″x96″
Cluster 1/7
Janet Mcgillis
2020
Oil on Canvas
16″x20″
Untitled
Agostina Gho
2019
Silver Point and Gold Leaf on Parchment and Wood
2″x2″x5/8″

~ ‘Schac’

‘Schac’ was an alias used by Kai Schachter, a British-American artist (1997-2019). Like far too many others, Kai tragically took his life while battling mental illness. He used art as his primary vehicle of expression a lamentable posthumous revelation. Kai’s work dealt with the inner workings of his mind through humor, self-deprecation, meandering streams of consciousness, and meditative visual expressions like dew and rain. Given the prevalence of mental illness and the tragic consequences that Kai fell victim to, we want to use the artistic gifts he left us to establish a grant in his name. We hope this grant will give artists the platform to make new creations, something Kai loved doing more than anyone.’Schac’, in honor of Kai Schachter, will exhibit a suite of ten drawings he made from 2017-2019. For each of the drawings, we have created an edition of ten pristine reproductions available for purchase. This exhibition is the beginning of an ongoing not-for-profit mission in which grants will be awarded to artists: a cycle in which proceeds will fund the following group of selected artists. Works of art created by the awardees will be exhibited in a yearly exhibition, the proceeds of which will fuel the grant for the following class. The primary aim of this inaugural exhibition is to kickstart the grant. We are hopeful that our first exhibition will allow for a sustainable series in which the the grant can operate. 
Kai lived an electric life. He touched the lives of every person he met, always leaving a smile on their face. Kai’s social generosity and his support for the people around him is the inspiration of our project. Although he is no longer with us, we want to keep Kai’s short but bright legacy alive eternally.

Written by Adrian Schachter

Untitled Drawing 10 
5 3/4 x 7 1/2 in 
10 3/8 x 12 1/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 9 
5 1/2 x 3 5/8 in 
10 1/8 x 8 1/8 in 
C. 2017 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 8 
3 5/8 x 5 1/2 in 
8 1/8 x 10 1/8 in 
C. 2017 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 6 
3 5/8 x5 1/2 in 
8 1/8 x 10 1/8 in 
C. 2017 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 7 
4 1/8 x5 7/8 in 
8 3/4 x 11 5/8 in 
C. 2019 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 5 
2 3/8 x 51/8 in 
7 1/4 x 9 5/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 4 
5 3/4 x7 1/2 in 
10 3/8 x 12 1/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 3 
5 3/4 x7 1/2 in 
10 3/8 x 12 1/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 2 
4 1/8 x5 7/8 in 
8 3/8 x 10 1/2 in 
C. 2019 
Graphite on Paper 
Untitled Drawing 1 
5 3/4 x 7 3/8 in 
10 3/8 x12 1/8 in 
C. 2018 
Pen on Paper 

~ FCKKDD Up: A Conversation with Raafae Ghory

FCKKDD Up: A Conversation with Raafae Ghory

The laptop rang on a Tuesday night. Dehydrated, STP’s Maya Kotomori pinged artist and friend Raafae Ghory into the Zoom call, eager to quench her thirst with some good art-chat. Raafae Ghory (b. 1997, Lahore) is a photography based artist whose recent work explores the ways in which a persona can be performatively generated, dispersed, and then corrupted in and across digital and physical spaces. We chat about it all in the wake of his sold out book, ‘FCKKDD.’

Maya Kotomori: What was the process of making this book like?

Raafae Ghory: It’s funny to think about an artistic process when memes [are the] subject matter. That’s so silly! Archiving these images was something I did naturally. I didn’t think about it as a process or practice until I had the idea of making a book. Then I started going back through the images, re-experiencing them. I came across some really good texts that became the foundational theoretical framework of the ideas behind what I did.

MK: What did you read?

RG: The first one that put me in a good place was Giving An Account of Oneself by Judith Butler. After that, I read The Undercommons by Fred Moten, I would recommend that if you haven’t read it. I read The Fisherwoman by Toni Morrison, also.

MK: Fire, I love her.

RG: Have you read that piece? 

MK: YES!!

RG: Yes! And also, The Society of the Spectacle by Guy Debord, which I just posted on my story yesterday, ‘cause I was thinking about Debord, and some French Marxists too. 

MK: So, the book is a processed version of your trap account on Insta that became a book! Beyond the account, where did you see that materiality going?

RG: I took the content of the account and wanted to recontextualize it into the form of a book. We’re so used to seeing these types of images right in front of our faces – on a screen – all day. Outside of that, [the book] is a way of reading the world around you. It’s subject matter that lives online! That’s so ingrained in our heads that we often don’t take the time to think about what we’re sharing or consuming. 

MK: There was a lot of personality within ‘FCKKDD.’ There’s also a lot of homies in the book. How did they feel to have that shout out in print?

RG: I don’t really know! A bunch of friends have seen the book in its earliest form when I made it three years ago. When I show it to them now, I get a lot of smiles. I think the content and just the nature of the book are both so overwhelming that people don’t even like when they see themselves in it, and they’re still processing all of the material in between that you have to go through, like on an online feed.

MK: If you could define that material in between, what is one word that you would use to define it?

RG: Ether.

MK: Ether – I love it. Did you know that not only is “ether” an imaginary space, but also a chemical? They used to use it back in the day as an anesthetic. I’m not super familiar with its structure, but I know it’s really bad for you. 

RG: Well, there you go. 

MK: The book feels like a really broken down time capsule for 2018. Why did you pick that year specifically?

RG: That’s a good question. I feel like the pain [of that year] was definitely an aspect to that. I also just happened to be in a class where I had free reign on what I wanted to create. I was trying to figure out a way to organize ‘FCKKDD’ in a way that made sense, and I also wanted to have a hard start and stop to the work. If there wasn’t that start and stop, the work becomes just like our feeds – it just keeps on going. Having a “year” was a good way to contain that set of work.

MK: Do you hope to make more collections? The side of the book says ‘Volume One’ and I’m trying to try to see another one…

RG: That’s kind of my intention. I mean, as you know, I still keep this ‘FCKKDD’ archive online and it’s an ongoing thing that I’ll do whenever I feel like it. I think the next one that I would do would be for the year 2020. It’s kind of obvious because we basically lived that entire year mediated through our technological tools, and most of our social interactions took place through the Internet. I want to look back at that, but I’m not really in a rush. I don’t really want to process that that year so soon.

MK: When you said 2020, it made me think back to Society of the Spectacle and the idea of the information highway, and the Agora, and how Debord made those connections with public space as a digital experience. With wanting a hard beginning and a hard stop, how would that translate into the layering that you used in the book? What are your opinions on time in that way?

RG: I did the layering and the collaging in the book as an aesthetic way to capture what it feels like to be in the internet. The “higher ups” have said Instagram is all clean lines and grids and you know, infinitely scrolling timelines, but it doesn’t feel that way for the most part. It can just feel like a disorganized sort of overstimulating experience of information, that’s never ending. I wanted to mimic that feeling. 

MK:  Logic question: is this the first physical book you’ve ever made in print?

RG: This is the first one that I’m putting out to the public. I made another book in 2017, that was just my photographs of my friends, and another for my project about Mecca. Books are my professional career right now. I work at a book publisher called Conveyor Studio in Jersey. It’s a cool spot, there’s only four of us in the shop. They have their own publishing label, and they do a lot of just on demand printing for museums and places like that.

MK: Bookbinding is fascinating! 

RG: It is! All 2020 I was still consuming content online, and that was what I posted during that time on my private account. That [reminds me of] one of the main questions that I posed for myself when I was making the book: how can you negotiate a personal experience against the idea of a collective consciousness, how might a stranger who doesn’t even know me be able to relate to the images based on content and subject matter? That [relationship] is ubiquitous, but then again, at the same time, it’s definitely a piece specific to it’s time.

MK: A lot of other artists right now put out self-defining work that is all identity politics, and you don’t do that at all, while building that relationship with the audience. It comes out in a lot of your other work too! I was going through my story archives earlier, and I remember when you had ‘Hajji’ at the Tisch windows for all of January and February and March…

RG: And April 😉

MK: This man said we got a four month run! How do you relate yourself in terms of those two projects – ‘Haajji’ and ‘FCKKDD’?

RG: That’s actually something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately and most of my traditional photography work revolves around these two words: like social documentary in a sense. At the same time, I was thinking about documentary as a form and what exactly that means. Even though it (FCKKDD) doesn’t really have the defining features of what one might consider a documentary, it’s still very much an object, an artifact of smaller artifacts that connect to different people in society.

MK: Super leading question but: how do you feel about the Internet? It’s funny how the internet was started, you know, as this big democratic network, and now, Trump is banned on Twitter? How do you see that [shift]? 

RG: That’s something I think about almost every day when I’m at work. I guess it’s really just a big double-edged sword in a sense, because I, myself, when making this book, I wrote a 15 page paper about how memes are the single most democratic form of social critique that we have to this day. But then again, at the same time, the Internet has enabled a space of unparalleled consumerism and just enabled this sort of obliviousness, if you’re not careful. Then you have all the other stuff that goes along with it, like the rise of the far right and that weird space. 

MK: Yeah, because the Internet facilitates everyone, it facilitates everyone. And it (internet) also isn’t a neutral thing either. The internet can fit certain agendas which is probably my favorite aspect of the book. The object itself is that the one thing that unifies it. 

RG: Another question that I was asking myself was how does our relationship with these images and cultural obsessions change with time? Because there’s a lot in that book that now exists as a dated cultural object in a sense, because we don’t share those images. I was asking the question of what happens to these images that we move on from? I was scrolling on Twitter and there’s people talking about ancient memes, which just popped up today. Like the original Wojack faces, you know what I’m talking about? Just out of nowhere, those are coming back up after what, 10 years of meme progression?

MK: That says a lot about the importance of the archive, because something really old can take on a new meaning, where the old thing is extra-important because it’s really old. And now the Internet is speeding that up where even the book feels distinctly “2018” though 2018 was only three years ago.

RG: Yeah. It’s insane. It’s crazy.

MK: What is your favorite ancient meme and how did you feel about Pepe the frog censorship?

RG: I don’t even know if I have an opinion on that. With memes, how can a certain group of people hijack an image, you know? [Pepe] has been recontextualized so many times on 4chan and Reddit. I don’t know if you’re active on Discord, but some of the Discord groups I’m in all use Pepe. The second you look at it, it just brings up these associations that have kind of been ascribed to it, when at the end of the day, it’s a picture of a frog. It’s so weird how a seemingly meaningless image can hold such cultural weight.

MK: The power of the zeitgeist, and also the power of concealing something is exactly what ‘FCKKDD’ subverts. It also has a dual existence. It still is a private account,  and it is a [sold-out] book. Before you opened the book to the public, did anyone random who doesn’t follow the account see it?

RG: Yeah, actually. It’s a funny story. I brought the book to Dashwood about a [couple months] ago, and I was showing it to Miwa.  She was really into it, but they’re not taking in books right now. While I was showing it to her, this random man in the store just came up and entered the conversation. And he was like, “Oh, I’m actually working on a project about the Internet, your book seems like it’s right up that alley.” So I was like, “Yeah sure, you want to look at it?” And he was like “Sick, how much? I’ll buy it right now.” And then I sold it to him at Dashwood.

MK: So you subverted Dashwood at Dashwood.

RG: Yeah, exactly. I was like, “you got Cash App?” And that random person, I think his name is Dylan or something, got a copy of the book before I released it.

MK: Do you have a favorite style moment or time period? 

RG: Kiko Kostadinov, or Old Navy.

MK: Bro, Old Navy is the shit. I remember like three years ago everyone was trying to bring Gap back and I’m just like, nah nah nah. It’s all about $5 tees at Old Navy.

RG: When I was a kid my mom always used to get clothes for me from Old Navy. I used to hate it so much. And now I’m finding the sickest Old Navy objects on Depop and thrift stores. I was not with it back in the day.

MK: Should we be expecting any ‘FCKKDD’ clothing drops in the future or…?

RG: You know, maybe. It’s not something I’m thinking about, but that might be cool. I don’t know what I would do, but nothing’s off the table.

MK: “Weigh all the options, nothing’s off the table.

~ In Conversation with Lucia Bell

When Lucia Bell-Epstein shoots the food at work, she doesn’t just capture the finished product. She includes bits of the floor, takes portraits of the kitchen staff, and snaps pictures of ingredients in the boxes they arrived in. All of these come together to create a narrative. She doesn’t want to make things feel fake. Her photographic diligence made collecting images for this interview a breeze. She wants this to be the truth. She doesn’t want to make the experience she’s having aestheticized,  but instead show  appreciation for the space and the people she gets to work with. This is an homage to them, to the farmers, to everyone who is a part of where this food comes from and where it ends up.

Lucia Bell-Epstein is an artist from the Lower East Side in New York. She takes photos and cooks, connecting the two with intent and intimacy. Lauryn-Ashley Vandyke is a producer, curator, and editor from Sugar land, Texas. She sat down with Lucia a couple months to talk about community, what fruits are in season, and her experience cooking at LaLou.

Lauryn-Ashley Vandyke: How would you describe your professional and personal relationship with food?

Lucia Bell-Epstein: Dance. Intimate. It’s what I think about when I’m alone in bed at one in the morning, trying to fall asleep, looking up or writing down notes on my phone about things I want to try to make. Saving photos of dishes that inspire me. There is no boundary between the professional and intimate. I work at a restaurant. That environment is different than if I’m cooking at home with friends. The rigidness that comes with working shapes your relationship to food. In terms of time and space, and in terms of learning how to put out food that you would want to eat yourself.

Jay Wolman, chef @ Lalou

But at work, it’s chef Jay Wolman‘s food. I work at LaLou, a natural wine bar and restaurant in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. Facilitating chef Jay’s ideas in a way that’s collaborative is really exciting. Say we make a citrus salad at work- when I go to the market on my own and see melons, kumquats or other winter citrus, I’m instantly inspired by what I’m doing at work. Those ingredients stick with me and it becomes intimate. I want to put my own twist on them.

LA: Do you have tips for people who want to incorporate fruit into their savory dishes?

LBE:

1. Mix fruit with olive oil and dairy, or something that bites, like a sharp lettuce. You could also take beets and pair them with a Clementine or some sort of blood orange. 

2. Slice apples on a mandolin and throw them into your favorite salad. See if you like that juicy, sweet taste. 

3. Baked apples, or poached pears and red wine. That’s delicious. You could take pears and poach them in a bottle of Malbec, and it’ll still be kind of sweet. Eat them with a piece of meat. That could be your side. 

It’s citrus season right now, which is crazy. I didn’t know that winter citrus was a thing until I got into food. 

LA: How do you know what’s in season?

LBE: I ask my mom, I ask chef Jay. I ask my friend Sam’s mom, Andrea. She knows everything about produce and the market. This morning we were recipe testing for her cookbook and she made confit kumquats. You submerge kumquats in olive oil and slowly bake them at 200-250 degrees for a few hours and they get nice and soft. You can eat them with literally anything; on breakfast with sour yogurt, or on a piece of toasted rye bread.

LA: What else is she putting in her cookbook? 

LBE: I don’t want to give too much away, but it’s from the perspective of a photographer, so aesthetically, it’s going to be gorgeous. She uses a lot of healthy ingredients that taste good, and a lot of Italian influence as well – farm to table vibes.

LA: How is cooking like making artwork?

LBE: It’s one in the same. One of the first things I observed working in the kitchen at Lalou was the idea of the dance; the physicality between chefs moving around seamlessly, sometimes without speaking. Building a salad is a total dance. You want to invite whoever’s eating your salad to taste the art in the way that you want them to. 

You know when you go on a date with someone and you’re fighting for that last bite of food with the most shaved Parmesan? Chef Jay always says to me that every bite of the food you put out should be like that. It’s just like if I’m taking a photograph, painting or drawing. I’m not gonna leave a quarter of surface lacking that kind of lust and lushness. 

LA: Could walk us through your plating process?

LBE: I’m such a new cook that I learn from watching. When I’m at home cooking for myself and my friends, I try to break lines of the plate or make things look a bit messy and realistic. The last thing I want is to cook something that is so perfect it feels unattainable. Food should be inviting. I think a little gem caesar salad plated with your hands can be just as inviting as something that was plated with tweezers.

My plating process depends on what I’m making, but height is something I strive for. I like things to be a bit glossy, so I like using olive oil to finish things. It makes everything look sexy. These are things I have learned from chef Jay and Andrea. 

I also love nights where I’m eating out of the pot. We’re young and don’t like doing the dishes all the time.

LA: Would you rather go on a dinner date or out for drinks?

LBE: Out on a date to get a nice meal. Even hotter than a dinner date; being invited over to cook dinner together.

LA:  In the kitchen, what does community mean?

LBE: It’s what I try to illustrate in the photos I take at LaLou.  The team I work with is quite small. 

I work with people that inspire me and change the way I think about food. Not many people can say that. In the kitchen, there are traditional hierarchies. I’m at the bottom of that totem pole because I just started working there, but it doesn’t feel that way. 

Whenever I’m photographing at the restaurant, it’s beautiful to watch how every person on the team has influenced and inspired the food that we put out.

Sitting after service and having a glass of wine with chef Jay and other cooks, listening to them talk about stuff that they want to make; it’s amazing. It’s a natural wine bar, too. I’m learning about orange wines and how to make food pairings with alcohol. Community-wise, it feels like a small family. 

LA: How do you build trust in that environment? 

LBE: I had to prove my work ethic and my seriousness to myself and the rest of the team. We have fun, but it’s serious work. It’s physically and mentally demanding. Trust was built through the feeling that my coworkers accepted me for who I am, despite the fact that I’m still learning.

Rather than going home feeling weighted and anxious from whatever mistakes I’ve made, I go home feeling inspired to do better. Not for myself, but for the team. Trust is an unspoken result of that. 

LA: What’s the difference between cooking with friends and cooking at work?

LBE: At work, I’m cooking the dishes that we serve, which are the dishes by chef Jay. At home, it’s my own intellectual property; I can do whatever I want. xI’m so excited to go to work and talk about what I cooked in my free time.

At work, there’s consistency.  Every chicory salad I make will look a little different, but they all have to taste the same. Learning about new ingredients, I get all of that at work too. I’m still growing as a cook and learning how to plate in new dance formations.

LA: What are three of your favorite color combinations?

LBE: I made this chocolate maple tart that was topped with toasted Sicilian pistachios with my friend Hedi. There’s a tan crust next to chocolate brown ganache. It’s finished with bright green pistachios with a pinkish purple hue.

As spring comes, I want to work with more green. I’m thinking about asparagus, wild arugula, leeks and green garlic, which will be sprouting up soon.

There’s a lot you can do with the color white; buttery, brothy cannellini beans with ribbons of pecorino….

LA: How do you come up with color combinations? Do you test things together visually?

LBE: It’s less about color combinations, and more about ingredient combinations. I’m not planning the color palette of things I want to make. I’m newly into beets. At work we made this salad with beets and shaved Humboldt fog, a type of cheese. The texture was amazing. There was the crunchiness, the green leaves, the white snowy humboldt fog with blue ash running through the middle. Then you have a glossy, tender, juicy beet dripping onto the side of the white plate and dying the lettuce. It’s finished with a bit of olive oil. When you take a bite into it, all those colors, textures, and flavors come together.

LA: Our hunger impulse is so associated with color.

LB: Oh totally. When I shoot the food at work, I’m trying to kind of zoom out and document everything from another perspective, not just cooking with the food or handling the ingredients. I really like including bits of the floor, other human beings, hands holding things or shooting within the containers of the ingredients. All of these come together to create a narrative. I don’t want to make things feel fake. I want my photos to show what we do at Lalou. I want this interview, like what I’m explaining to you, to be the truth. I don’t want to make the experience I am having there be aestheticized in my work that I’ve shot there, but rather my appreciation for my space there and the people I get to work with. It’s an homage to the farmers, I’m considering where this food comes from and who’s growing it

LA: Why should people have a relationship with their food from start to finish?

LBE: The first thing that comes to mind Canal Cafeteria. You can go to their produce stand and get free groceries. They’re community-building in the Lower East Side, where I grew up. It’s great to see people in my generation taking initiative like that. 

Now more than ever, we need to know where our food is coming from, what we’re putting into our bodies, and how we can buy things that support small businesses and local economies. People make the argument that it’s cheaper to get pre-packaged food but there are ways to buy healthy, fresh ingredients without having to spend an exorbitant amount of money. Invest in what you put into your body.

LA: Self-love. 

LBE: There’s nothing that releases more endorphins for me than cooking for myself. You learn so much about yourself, what you like and what you don’t like. It’s a labor of love.

LA: Ben made the analogy between ordering food vs. cooking at home being like swiping on Tinder vs. meeting someone in real life.

LBE: Part of growing up is learning how to nourish yourself.

LA: What traits make someone easy to work with in the kitchen?

LBE: We all have bad days and get moody, myself included. Keeping that outside of the professional environment is critical to being a part of a team. If one person’s feeling off, everybody else feels it. It’s how it is in any work environment. 

What makes it easy to work with someone? Being a good listener and teacher. Everyone I work with is easy to work with because they all love what they’re doing. If I was working in some corporate job with people that hated their work, it would be a very different environment. At Lalou, every person in the kitchen is passionate about food and cooking. If you go there and eat the food, you’re tasting their hard work. They care. That in itself is art.

~ No Boundaries: An Interview with Ali Sahmel and Emily McElwreath

No Boundaries: An Interview with Ali Sahmel and Emily McElwreath

 The art world has a tendency to forgo boundaries. Living, working, and scheming all in the same building in East Williamsburg, Ali Sahmel and Emily McElwreath are a prime example of how romance and professionalism can overlap and create a partnership built to last. McElwreath’s vast experience in high-end art advisory and Sahmel’s title as one of the few master chromists in New York City solidify the two as a power couple. This label is not lost on the two, who have recently teamed together to join the handful of art galleries popping up in East Williamsburg. In the midst of working with the couple to organize STP Group Show 3, STP Blog Editor in Chief Lauryn-Ashley Vandyke pops into their apartment across the hall from the gallery for a conversation about what it’s like to mix business with pleasure. 

LA: How would you two describe the work that you do, and does it ever overlap?

Ali Sahmel: There’s Pegasus Prints, and there’s Sidel McElwreath. Pegasus is a print shop studio creating and collaborating with artists. 

Emily McElwreath: With Sidel McElwreath, it’s art advisory and curation. I’ve never been with someone as involved in the art community as I am. There is so much overlap. We are either working with the same artist, or there’s a person I’d always wanted to work with, and Ali introduced me, or vice versa. The overlap was super beneficial for both of our careers.

LA: Did you guys meet through art? 

EM: We met on Tinder. Living in New York City in the queer community, it’s hard to meet people. Plus, we’re so busy. I wasn’t bar hopping, meeting people. 

LA: And there are no lesbian bars anymore.

AS: Well there’s Ginger’s, in Park slope. There’s Cubbyhole. They’re still there.

LA: What was your first date?

AS: It was an Irish pub type place in Clinton Hill. They have the best popcorn there. It was just a block away from my house. I was like, if we’re gonna meet, you’re coming to me.

EM: We started dating right away, as lesbians do. The synergy was there immediately. I had been in business for four years. I was at the Brant Foundation as director of communications and education for six years. Then, I went out on my own and started my art advisory. Your first five years of going out on your own, you’re an infant. Although I was still green, when Ali was like, I want to start my own silk-screen studio,I’d had the experience of starting a small business.

Pegasus Prints Studio

LA: You’re both workaholics.

EM: Ali’s far more organized than I am, but in terms of time in, we’re both constantly working.

AS: We work a lot. Making things, but also looking at shows, studio visits, researching, staying informed. 

LA: When I think of the dynamic between me and my work husband, Ben, the reason it works is because we both have our own thing. It overlaps in that we support each other, and we get to collaborate, but we’re always equals. There’s never a weird power dynamic in our relationship.

EM: Being equal is the only way it works. We both have our own separate things that exist without the other person. Those two things are going to exist, even if we don’t as a couple.

AS: We offer different things which benefit the other. Emily’s more outgoing and assertive. I’m more hands-on and creative. It’s a good team.

EM: Launching the art space, Pegasus Gallery, was a no brainer. It used to be an office space for the previous owner of the studio. We came up here and we were like, why don’t we have some sort of experimental, invitation only, art space where we can bring in young curators and emerging artists.

AS: Not as much structure as a Chelsea Gallery.

EM: Downstairs (Pegasus Prints Shop) is the bread-and-butter business. The gallery gives us the freedom to play. That’s where the overlap is- we’re co-directors of the gallery. 

STP Group Show 3 at Pegasus Gallery

LA: What are your goals with both of your projects?

AS: Stepping outside of the box, not creating your traditional print, experimenting with different mediums, paints, and ink. I want to get something new and fresh, so I’m experimenting with airbrush or with printing on different types of substrates. 

EM: I’ve worked with everything from blue chip artists to total emerging artists. I deal with the blue chip pieces so I have the opportunity to take chances with emerging artists. I love being able to go to the collector that has a Julian Schnabel in their living room and say, check this artist out. They just graduated and I want you to invest in their talent. 

LA: How has digital innovation affected printmaking and selling and purchasing artwork?

AS: Digital printing is easier and faster. It’s like reading the newspaper versus picking up your phone. With that said, it makes me appreciate it more. For me, printmaking is a completely different aesthetic that I’m naturally more drawn to than digital.With the silkscreen process, you see the hand; the tedious nature of creating something.

EM: In terms of digital takeover across the board,  we’re 40 year old women. It doesn’t come organically to us. In college, I was still going to the library to use their desktop to write my essays, and actually printing them with a printer to hand it in. It’s a constant learning curve. 

LA: There’s a new appreciation for printmaking. People crave that physical process.

AS: Yes. To see the trace of your hand, the manual creation of something, versus hitting buttons all day and just spitting something out.

EM: There’s always going to be room for the authentic, classic, beauty of tangible art. It’s like a little black dress. It doesn’t ever go out of style. There’s an element of the fine art world, especially silk screen, that doesn’t change.  Luckily we are dealing with fine art, which for the most part remains tangible and separate from digital takeover.

Ali at Pegasus Prints

LA: What did you guys learn about each other through the process of teaching Emily about printmaking?

AS: Emily’s very impatient. She has a difficult time multitasking. We have a different eye. 

EM: However, we work well together. We have to. To be able to sustain two small businesses,  we both had to help each other out and move into parts of ourselves that are uncomfortable. I’m not that detail oriented. Allie is so organized, patient and all those things that go into being a printmaker. I don’t have those. I’m scrappy, I’m fast, I’m impatient. I want results right away. We’re very different, but I’m still in the shop, racking the prints and helping her, because we have to. It’s free help. When you’re lovers and you work together, it’s like, I need you for five hours downstairs because I’m not paying someone to come in today.

AS: When we meet with artists, too, we just bring forth different concepts and respond to artists differently. It works due to the differences.

EM: I’ve had to learn to take second place to Allie when we’re [in the print shop]. It’s Allie’s studio, and I’m in it. That does not come naturally for me. I’m bossy. I like to be in charge. I’ve gotten to the point where I don’t try to do that in the studio anymore, because I don’t know what the fuck I’m doing. That’s a big learning curve.

LA: When you love someone so much and you’re working together, there’s never any ugh, I can’t believe they’re making me do this. You want to be there.

EM: Yeah. Everything bleeds into one. There’s no we’re doing each other a favor by doing this

AS: Emily comes down and works with me in the print shop, but also, when she’s doing studio visits, I come and add my insight or criticism in some way. Emily spills into my world and I spill into her world.

EM: I’ve gotten 10 times cooler dating Ali. She’s like, why don’t you come with me to meet this young artist? Then when we’re there she’s like, I’m a chromist. They’re like, oh my god.

LA: What is your favorite thing about working with your partner and what is your least favorite thing?

AS:  I love always being around Emily. She’s so fun and funny. At the same time, it’s hard always being together; working together, living together, going to studio visits-

LA: And you don’t have doors in your apartment.

AS: Right. So I value my alone time, my space. I’m a Gemini. I’m contradicting myself. At the same time, I want to be alone.

EM: I’ll oftentimes make the call, like, I’m going to go away for the night. I’ll feel that we need a beat.

The best thing about working together is that Ali’s my favorite person. I want to be around her all the time. We’re talking about working together, living together, and getting through a pandemic together. It’s created a level of intimacy that I didn’t know existed. It’s also two women. I can’t even express how much work needs to go into understanding one another when it’s two women together all the time.

LA: Emotions, sensitivity, thoughtfulness. Women understand; they see so much.

EM: Yeah. I don’t want to see it all. I  want to be that dumb dude who’s like, what’s the matter? My favorite thing is being around her, and my least favorite thing probably has to do with me, and my lack of patience and ability to let go of the reins. That’s really hard for me. Sometimes I’m unpleasant to be around. I’m trying to work  on that.

LA: I feel like everyone says communication, communication, communication. No one ever says, let things go.

EM: You have to let things go. That’s such a good point. We do our best when we’re able to accept one another for who we are. When it’s not good, we hone in on every little thing. It becomes, why’d you do thatWhat’s going onLet’s talk about it. Sometimes there’s nothing to talk about. Also, we’re 40, this is who we are. It might get a little better, but there won’t be some huge upheaval of our personalities.

LA: Can you talk about building trust with each other, but also, the artists you work with?

EM: It was important for me, when I started my own business, to build relationships with the art community. Especially the emerging, mid-career art community. Go into those studios, get to know the artists on a personal level. With that comes a level of trust. These artists are allowing me in their spaces. They’re allowing me into their lives. They’re allowing me to sell work for them. I always liked this quote: Love comes easy. You don’t have to earn love. You have to earn trust, and respect. You can really dig someone, love them, but the trust and respect comes after. That takes a while. 

AS: When you’re building and nurturing these relationships, the dialogue is a little bit more at ease. Concepts come naturally, it just kind of flourishes. The more you build relationships with artists, things  grow and evolve.

EM: It’s creating like a family for ourselves. My favorite part of our relationship is getting to be mama bears, creating this family of artists, creatives, makers, thinkers, and having a physical hub for people to come to.

Ali, Emily, and Trempor in their loft

LA: How do you build a creative community through the work that you do?

EM: First of all, it takes time. Time, and experience. I’m a huge networker. I’m always connecting the dots. You have to make it a priority to meet people; go to the shows, go to the openings, go to the events. Be authentic. Instagram has allowed us the opportunity to feel connected with one another. There’s a lot of stuff that I hate about Instagram and social media at large, but I love more than I hate.

AS: It’s accessible, easy, and efficient.

LA: You can’t have one without the other. Right now, at least.

EM: 50% of the artists that I do studio visits with, I’m introducing myself via Instagram. Like, this artist told me to check you outI’d love to see your work in person. 

Plus, we get to see what LA is doing at 1:00 AM on a Tuesday. We’re not going to be at that restaurant with you, because we’re on our 10th dream, but I get to wake up and be like look at what LA did last night.

LA: I love Instagram. I didn’t have one for 6 years. I needed the break, to learn to love myself and to not find that validation through other people.

AS: Did you delete your account and then come back?

LA: I deleted it in 2016.

AS: It’s like deleting part of your identity, then reappearing. It’s your digital identity.

~ Liquid Extremes

In an age of extreme uncertainty, the motions of the familiar have become broken by an appropriate need for change. Liquid Extremes does not attempt to know any one angle of absolute truth, but instead invites the viewer to have an internal dialogue with where they stand emotionally, mentally, and spiritually (through figurative visual art) during these uncertain times. The art presented hopes to reflect the current change occurring at this moment and make it visible to some degree in order to have a conversation with the self, despite the growing frequency of noise being televised at every moment. From this precarious point forth, one needs to slow down and ask themselves, “What now?” before embarking towards this new decade.

Exhibition Catalogue

ENTER LIQUID EXTREMES

~ New Landscapes (2020) by John Spiliopoulos & Elpiniki Gelagoti

New Landscape 1
John Spiliopoulos
Elpiniki Gelagoti,
Graphite and Ink on Paper.
5.83 x 8.27 in.
14.81 x 21.01 cm.
New Landscape 2
John Spiliopoulos
Elpiniki Gelagoti,
Graphite and Ink on Paper.
5.83 x 8.27 in.
14.81 x 21.01 cm.
New Landscape 3
John Spiliopoulos
Elpiniki Gelagoti,
Graphite and Ink on Paper.
5.83 x 8.27 in.
14.81 x 21.01 cm.
New Landscape 4
John Spiliopoulos
Elpiniki Gelagoti,
Graphite and Ink on Paper.
5.83 x 8.27 in.
14.81 x 21.01 cm.
New Landscape 5
John Spiliopoulos
Elpiniki Gelagoti,
Graphite and Ink on Paper.
5.83 x 8.27 in.
14.81 x 21.01 cm.
New Landscape 6
John Spiliopoulos
Elpiniki Gelagoti,
Graphite and Ink on Paper.
5.83 x 8.27 in.
14.81 x 21.01 cm.
New Landscape 7
John Spiliopoulos
Elpiniki Gelagoti,
Graphite and Ink on Paper.
5.83 x 8.27 in.
14.81 x 21.01 cm.
New Landscape 8
John Spiliopoulos
Elpiniki Gelagoti,
Graphite and Ink on Paper.
5.83 x 8.27 in.
14.81 x 21.01 cm.

~ STP Fashion Week

STP fashion week is an open submission online fashion showcase that will happen during NYC fashion week in lieu of access to physical spaces and opportunities for emerging designers. The show is free and open to anyone interested in fashion; all work that is submitted will be included. STP fashion week will kick off September 17th, 2020 on stp.world with a collective show of submitted works featured as clickable cutouts. In addition to images of their work, designers are invited to submit original supporting content to be released at intervals throughout the week amidst a series of live streams and zoom seminars. Submissions open August 8th at 12:00AM EST and close September 17th at 11:59PM EST.

For more information or assistance with your submission please email help@stp.world.

how to submit (click submit button below)

~ Yard Sale

Organized by Lumia Nocito, Yard Sale is a group exhibition raising money for The Loveland Foundation, an organization working to provide financial assistance to Black women and girls seeking therapy. The show features the work of 21 artists but YOU can SUBMIT your work and help raise money for The Loveland Foundation. To submit please click link below:
https://forms.gle/p1TgxtRAYjZnK1FF8

1 Too Many
Justin Jin
Matte Photographic Print with Pastel
8.5 x 11 
155 Years Later, 2020
Justin Jin
Digital Inkjet Print
10 x 12 in
25.4 x 30.48 cm
2020
Alex Kaye
Print
23.4 x 33.1 inch
59.4 x 84.1 cm
2b1
Tashi Salsedo
Acrylic Paint on Paper
5 x 7 inches
12.7 x 17.78 centimeters
ACAB, 2020
Sippakorn Ponpayong
Photography
16 x 24
40.64 x 60.96
Again, Gauguin. 2020
Seth Henry Fountain
Graphite, paper
5 x 7
12.7 x 17.78 
ALL COPS ARE BAD, 2020
Priya Lad
Print on medium weight paper
8.5 x 11
22 x 28
Americana, 2014
Tania Torres
Oil paint
12 x 12 x 1 
30.48 x 30.48 x 3
ANTI, 2020
Gabriel J. Shuldiner 
Postapocalypticblack™, Steel, Japanese Cotton Cord, Concrete
5 x 2.75 x 2.5
12.7 x 6.98 x 6.35
At The Drop of a Head, 2019
Gala Prudent
Photolithograph on Mohawk superfine
11.75 x 9.5 in
30 x 24 cm
b, 2020
Diego Herrera
Oil and Acrylic on Canvas
8 x 10 in
20.32 x 25.4 cm
Baby Don’t Cry, 2019
Stephanie Blackburn
Watercolor, Acrylic, Ink
9 x 12.2
23cm x 31cm
Baby Don’t Grow Up, 2019
Stephanie Blackburn
Watercolor, Acrylic, Ink
9 x 12.2
23cm x 31cm
Bad Bet/The House, 2020
Jesse Orion
Oil on fiberboard
10 x 6.5 in
25.4 x 16.51 cm
Basketball #5, 2020
Sebastien Samson
Acrylic Paint and Red Wine on Canvas
22.5 x 30 in
57.15 x 76.2 cm
Blossoming With The Trees, 2020
Chloe Xiang
Photography
8 x 10 
20 x 25 
Brisk #2, 2019
Armando Nin
Photograph
16 x 20 in
40.64 x 50.8 cm
Broken Clocks, 2020
Cameron Milton
Digital Painting/Print
12 x 8 
30.48 x 20.82
CANCELLED, 2020
Ivy Stewart
Video (Print)
24 x 13 in
60.96 x 33.02 cm
Case-specific diorama II, 2019
Bella Newman
Photograph
8.5 x 11 in
21.59 x 27.94 cm
Chainmail Bikini, 2020
Emma Fasciolo
Aluminum Chain
16 x 12 x 8
41 x 30 x 20
Chaos in the streets, 2020
Aidan Cullen
Photograph printed on glossy paper
16 x 24 in
40.64 x 60.96 cm
El Camino Blvd., 2019
Thomas Elliott
Oil on canvas
30 x 35 x 2 in
76.2 x 88.9 x 2.08 cm
Family Matter, 2020
James Hill
Collage
11 x 16
N/A
Far Away, Everything Has A Pattern, 2018
Nathalia Fagundes
Photography
10 x 8
N/A
Fast Forward – Metal Print, 2020
Xander Raith
Photography
15″ x 12″ x .03″
38.1 x 30.48 x .07 cm
Flowers by the Shore, 2018
Nicholas Shaya
Photograph
16 x 20
40 x 51
Francais, 2019
Vyczie Dorado
Watercolor on canvas
11 x 8.5 in
27.94 x 21.59 cm
Frisbee in Central Park, 2019
Layton Davis
Archival Inkjet Print
16 x 20 
40.64 x 50.8
Glow Walker, 2020
Jessica Floyd
Marker on paper
5×5 in
12.7×12.7 cm
Guy at Manhattan Beach Boardwalk
Johan Orellana
Digital Photograph, Full Frame DSLR
16×20
40×50



Hi Vista , 2020
Amalie Gassmann
35mm film 1/1 print
12 x 18 in
30.48 x 45.72 cm
I See Triple, 2019
Mia Manning
Photograph printed on glossy paper
8.5 x 11
21.59 x 27.94
Implosive Earthquake, 2020
Adrian Schachter
Pastels on Paper
11.7 x 16.5 
29.718 x 41.91 
In Pink, 2020
Kate Kim
Acrylic
18 x 24 x 1 in
45.7 x 60.9 x 2.54 cm
In the Window, 2020
Matt Reiner
Oil on Canvas
16 x 20 x 0.75
40.64 x 50.8 x 1.9
Internally ugly, 2020
Roberto Villarreal 
Silk Screen Print
25 x 20
63.5 x 50.8
Invisible Again
Willa Bartholomay
Oil and Charcoal on Canvas
31 x 35
78.7 x 88.9
Juanita, 2020
Daniel Barrera
Oil and Acrylic on board
10 x 13.5 in
25 x 34.3 cm
Kobe, 2020
Narayan Forest Lockett
Photography
10 x 8 x 0.1 in
25.4 x 20.32 x 0.254 cm
Lacan’t Understand You
Marissa Delano
Watercolor painting
5 x 7 inches
12.7 x 17.78 centimeters
Laura D, 2020
Dean Dicriscio
Image transfer on paper 
11 x 14 in
27.9 x 35.6 cm
Lovers, 2020
Sarah Goldman
Gouache on Paper
11.69 x 16.53
29.7 x 42
Malevolent Spirits 2020
Colin Burns
Linocuts and watercolor on paper
15 x 11
38.1 x 27.94 cm
Mollification, 2020
Lumia Nocito
Blood, sweat, tears, and a little bit of fire
16 x 23 in
40.64 x 58.42 cm
Moonlight, 2018
Chloe Xiang
Photography
8 x 10 in
20 x 25 cm
Mother of Vaginas, 2019
Margaux Halloran
Oil on Canvas
48 x 36 x 4
121 x 91 x 10
Mountain Weaving, 2019
Alex Brown
Acrylic yarn, plastic beads 
7 x 11.5 x 0.25
17.78 x 29.21 x 0.63
Nefertiti, 2018
Luisa Alcântara
Oil and thumb tacks on polyester
12 x 10 x 2
30.48 x 25.4 x 5.08
New Order, 2020
Zoe Vance
Marker on paper
8.5 x 11 in
21.59 x 27.94 cm

~ Quarantine Portraits by Alfonse Ruggiero

Alfonse Ruggiero (b.1947)

Diego Rivera in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Diego Rivera in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Andy Warhol in Quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Andy Warhol in Quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Da Vinci in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Da Vinci in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Regular price
Vincent Van Gogh  in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Vincent Van Gogh in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Barack Obama in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Barack Obama in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Matisse in Quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Matisse in Quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Frida Kahlo  in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Frida Kahlo in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Basquiat in Quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Basquiat in Quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Jesus in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Jesus in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
La Donna in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
La Donna in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Ai Weiwei in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Ai Weiwei in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Fellini in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Fellini in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Michelle Obama in quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Michelle Obama in quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Kurt Cobain in Quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Kurt Cobain in Quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Georgia O'Keeffe in Quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Georgia O’Keeffe in Quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches
Picasso in Quarantine, 2020 - Serving the People
Picasso in Quarantine, 2020
Alfonse Ruggiero
Color pencil on paper
12h x 9w inches

~ Outer by Elliott Chambers

Elliott Chambers (b. 1994) Lives and works in London, UK. “I make paintings about the realm we create for ourselves, be it in reality or fantasy. I am focused on the idea of ‘place’ and the imagery that defines it. My paintings are scenes of importance to me.”

Barn With Silo, 2018 - Serving the People
Barn With Silo, 2018
Elliott Chambers
Oil on canvas
14 x 18 in
35.56 x 45.72 cm
Defender & Windows, 2019 - Serving the People
Defender & Windows, 2019
Elliott Chambers
Oil on linen
10 x 12.5 in
25.4 x 31.75 cm
Beamed Building in Field, 2020 - Serving the People
Beamed Building in Field, 2020
Elliott Chambers
Oil on canvas
20 x 16 in
50.8 x 40.64 cm
Inflation, 2019 - Serving the People
Inflation, 2019
Elliott Chambers
Oil on canvas 
14 x 12 in
35.56 x 30.48 cm
Night House , 2019 - Serving the People
Night House , 2019
Elliott Chambers
Oil on linen
10 x 12.5 in
25.4 x 31.75 cm
Fog, 2018 - Serving the People
Fog, 2018
Elliott Chambers
Oil on linen
10 x 12.5 in
25.4 x 31.75 cm

~ Self Portrait

Trinket Two, 2019 - Serving the People
Trinket Two, 2019
Mariel Rolwing Montes
Oil on wood panel
10″ x 10″ x 1″
25.4 x 25.4 x 2.54
There is more substance in me then it appears - Serving the People
There is more substance in me then it appears
Derek Buetow
Prescription
8.5 x 11 in.
21.59 x 27.94 cm.
Self Portrait in Studio, 2019 - Serving the People
Self Portrait in Studio, 2019
Max Berry
Oil and acrylic on canvas
13.5 x 9.5 x .5 in.
35 x 25 x 3 cm.
Self Isolation Portrait (day 5), 2020 - Serving the People
Self Isolation Portrait (day 5), 2020
Anders Lindseth
crayon on panel
8 x 6 x .75 in
20.32 x 15.24 x 1.91 cm
Self Portrait with Baby Bottle Pop, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait with Baby Bottle Pop, 2020
Asher Liftin
Ink on paper
12 x 9 in.
30.4 x 22.8 cm.
Am I? - Serving the People
Am I?
Elpiniki Gelagoti
Ink on Paper
11.8 x 8.26 in.
30 x 21 cm.
Mermaid,  2020 - Serving the People
Mermaid, 2020
Ariel Nicholson
Oil and pastel on paper
Selbstportrait als Maleraffe, 2020 - Serving the People
Selbstportrait als Maleraffe, 2020
Sebastian Supanz
Colored wool felted through canvas
19.7 x 15.75 x 0.78 in.
50 x 40 x 2 cm.
Self Portrait (The Artist, The Cannibal), 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait (The Artist, The Cannibal), 2020
Chris Capoyianes
Graphite
6 x 4 in.
15.24 x 10.16 cm.
Self Portrait, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait, 2020
Christopher Nwalupue
Printworks Multipurpose Paper
8.5 x 11 in.
22 x 28 cm.
Double Self Portrait, 2020 - Serving the People
Double Self Portrait, 2020
Adrian Schachter
Acrylic on mirror
12 x 12 x 1  in
30.48 x 30.48 x 2.5 cm
Self-portrait, 2020 - Serving the People
Self-portrait, 2020
Chiara Di Luca
Oil on paper
13 x 9.5 in.
33 x 24 cm.
Self Portrait, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait, 2020
Zoë Argires
Graphite on paper
8.5 x 10.25 in.
21.6 x 26.1 cm.
Untitled, 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled, 2020
Georgie Somerville
Oil pastel
30 x 60 in
76.2 x 152.4 cm
Banana cake sunshine, 2020 - Serving the People
Banana cake sunshine, 2020
Sage Schachter
Digital C-Print
8.27 x 5.83 in
21 x 14.8 cm
edition of 2
Self Portrait with Bird of Prey and Prey, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait with Bird of Prey and Prey, 2020
Luca Cocchiano
Oil Pastels and Dry Pastels on Canvas
20 x 16 x 1.5 in
50.8 x 40.6 x 3.8 cm
Color ID, 2020 - Serving the People
Color ID, 2020
Dominic Santos
Acetate collage slide
2 x 2 in
5.08 x 5.08 cm
Untitled Plant Selfie, 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled Plant Selfie, 2020
Bryan Bowie
Graphite on paper
8.5 x 11 in.
21 x 27 cm.
Self Portrait, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait, 2020
Emily Pinto
Acrylic paint on paper
7 x 9 in.
17.78 x 22.86 cm.
Taz the Toy - Serving the People
Taz the Toy
Taz
Action figure
6 x 4 in
Self Portrait with Crown of Thorns, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait with Crown of Thorns, 2020
Alexandra Velasco
Acrylic and Oil on Canvas
16 x 12 x 1 in.
40.64 x 30.48 x 2.54 cm.
Self Portrait, 2018 - Serving the People
Self Portrait, 2018
Kunle F. Martins
Graphite on cardboard
32 x 16 in.
81.28 x 41.91 cm.
FOR LACK OF AN AUDIENCE, BE YOUR OWN VOYEUR, 2020 - Serving the People
FOR LACK OF AN AUDIENCE, BE YOUR OWN VOYEUR, 2020
Ana Velasco
Acrylic and vinyl paint on canvas
36 x 24 in
91 x 61 x 2 cm
The Regulator, 2020 - Serving the People
The Regulator, 2020
Alexander Hill
Chicken wire, cardboard, plaster wrap, foam board, acrylic, metal studs and hardware
20 x 16.5 x 16.5 in.
50.8 x 41.9 x 41.9 cm.
Self Portrait With a Thought, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait With a Thought, 2020
Zhiruo Gao
Oil on Canvas
15.7 x 15.7 x 0.7 in.
40 x 40 x 2 cm.
Si me puedes ver. Pero no me puedes tener <3, 2020 - Serving the People
Si me puedes ver. Pero no me puedes tener <3, 2020
Camila Villa Zertuche
Oil paint and oil pastel on canvas
12 x 9 x 1 in.
30.5 x 22.9 x 2.5 cm.
Isolation Easter, 2020 - Serving the People
Isolation Easter, 2020
Maya Crowne
Pencil on Paper
14 x 17
35.6 x 43.2 cm
Self Portrait, Sitting Between a Mirror and a Ghost, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait, Sitting Between a Mirror and a Ghost, 2020
Giovanni Forlino
Charcoal and oil pastel on cream colored cotton paper
19.75h x 16.5w in
50h x 42w cm
 
Self-Portrait, 2018 - Serving the People
Self-Portrait, 2018
Jeff Mendonca
Oil on canvas over panel
14 x 11 x 1 IN
35.56 x 27.94 x 2.54 cm
Inside vs Outside, 1999 - Serving the People
Inside vs Outside, 1999
Carrie Wong
Acrylic paint and felt
24 x 20 in
61 x 51 cm
Only A Flicker, 2020 - Serving the People
Only A Flicker, 2020
John Hurley
Oil pastel on paper
9 x 12 in. 
22.86 x 30.48 cm.
SunShowers, 2019 - Serving the People
SunShowers, 2019
Quiara Torres
Oil on Burlap Sack
20 x 12 in
50 x 30 cm
Orange person, 2020 - Serving the People
Orange person, 2020
Jessica Floyd
Marker, colored pencil on paper
11 x 8 in.
28 x 22 cm.
Capitalism is a blood sacrifice - Serving the People
Capitalism is a blood sacrifice
Laura Baran
Acrylic ink and pastel on paper
14 x 11 in.
3.56 x 2.79 cm.
(PHiLip), 2009 - Serving the People
(PHiLip), 2009
Philip Ellersgaard
Pencil on A4 paper
8.27 × 11.69 in
Maternal Mass, 2019
Alexia Mavroleon
Video
Duration: 12:01
Self-portrait, Among Others, 2019 - Serving the People
Self-portrait, Among Others, 2019
Nima Arabi
Drawing: Charcoal on Paper
30 x 20 in.
75 x 50 cm.
Self Portrait in Warehouse,  2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait in Warehouse, 2020
Daniel De La Rosa
Wax medium and dry pigment on foam board
8.5x 25.5 in
21.59 x 64.77 cm
Pet Peeve, 2020 - Serving the People
Pet Peeve, 2020
Aaron Bondaroff
Color pencil on paper
33 x 40 in.
Self Portrait, 2020 - Serving the People
Self Portrait, 2020
Guy Kozak
Graphite on Paper
17 x 14 in.
43 x 35 cm.

~ BFA Show 2020

BFA Student Show is a student organized exhibition composed of artworks from students currently enrolled in BFA programsfrom almost 60 art schools around the world and counting! 

Artworks from the show will be exhibited here at https://stp.world/ at the end of the school year. All currently enrolled BFA students are invited to submit their work and be a part of this exhibition! As of right now we have brought together representatives from the following schools:

  1. RISD – Ethan Shaw
  2. Cooper Union – Ben Werther
  3. Pratt – Bennett Smith
  4. Parsons – Lauren Cather and August Blum
  5. SVA – Adrian Schachter
  6. NYU – Adam Fried and Paige Labuda
  7. Barnard – Mia Greenberg
  8. Yale – Ronan Day Lewis 
  9. University of Tennessee – Cali York
  10. Reed – Nick Schlesinger
  11. CalArts – Chloe Palmer
  12. UT Austin – Caroline Perkison
  13. Bennington – Lauren Bradley
  14. Goldsmiths – Theadora Sutherland
  15. Slade – Giulia Ley
  16. Bard – Ines Barquet 
  17. Glasgow School of Arts – Purdey Williams 
  18. UCLA – Arthur Wechsler
  19. HGK Basel – Joaquim Cantor Miranda
  20. CUNY – Eva Alcantara Sierra
  21. SAIC – Juan Arango Palacios
  22. New World – Gabriela Fernandez
  23. Tyler – Bridge Mccartan
  24. MICA – Kira Bell
  25. Concordia University – Xavier Bélanger-Dorval
  26. PAFA – Aaron Feltman
  27. Maine College of Art – Alejandra Cuadra
  28. University of Puerto Rico – Gaby Leonor
  29. Central Saint Martins – Georgie Sommerville and Ryan Brake 
  30. Columbia University – Oscar Hou and Alyssa Gengos
  31. Pennsylvania State University – Kristen Byrne
  32. Chelsea College of Arts – Scarlet Topley
  33. Massachusetts College of Art and Design – Tashi Salsedo
  34. Washington University in St. Louis – Alessandra Ferrari-Wong and Jiyoon Kang
  35. UC Davis – Mika Ware
  36. SUNY Purchase – Jasper Kesin
  37. USC – Gabrielle Robinson
  38. Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design – Olive Craine
  39. Marist College – Isabella Biagioli
  40. Edinburgh College – Cameron Mellors
  41. California College of the Arts – Darian Newman, Anna Nunes, and Lindsey Reddick
  42. School of Museum of Fine Arts – Jean Chung
  43. University of Arkansas – Penny Molesso
  44. Virginia Commonwealth University – Moira Neve and Cali Carter
  45. Escuela de Artes Plásticas y Diseño – Daniel Pabon
  46. Wesleyan University – Sultan Olusekun
  47. Carnegie Mellon – Hannah Kang
  48. Lewis & Clark College – Elana Goff
  49. Kent State University – Griffin Allman
  50. SCAD – John Grund
  51. Converse College – Kate Frost
  52. Fashion Institute of Technology – Camila Palacios
  53. Ruskin School of Art – Olivia Williamson and Mihaela Man
  54. Corcoran School of the Arts & Design – Catie Leonard
  55. Otis College of Art and Design – Aya Galgani and Zach Benson
  56. University of Puget Sound – Rebecca Connolly
  57. Cornell University – Steven Cha
  58. UAL, London College of Communication – Emma Toma
  59. University of Hawai’i at Manoa – Lauren Calkins
  60. London College of Fashion – Georgios Trochopoulos
  61. Athens School of Fine Arts – Elpiniki Gelagoti
  62. Konstfack – Caroline Nord
  63. Columbus College of Art & Design – Dylan Phipps
  64. OCAD University – Samantha Lance
  65. University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign – Symone Sanz
  66. Camberwell College of Art UAL – Grace Piddington Donald
  67. Wimbledon College of Art UAL – Georgia Spencer
  68. Ryerson University – Lucy Alguire
  69. Syracuse University – Tracey Jean-Claude

To submit please click link below:
https://forms.gle/hSqiomtjHDgLhb9b8

**Submissions deadline: May 15, 2020  

For more information please get in touch with your school’s representative, or email us at bfa@stp.world

If your school is not listed above, please contact us to become a representative. We look forward to celebrating these students and hope this opportunity will allow us all to connect and build long lasting relationships.

Press inquires – press@stp.world

~ NEW DRAWINGS AND TAPES by Andy Heck Boyd

Andy Heck Boyd is a painter and surrealist animation filmmaker. His prolific practice is motivated, in part, by his paranoid schizophrenia and his experience hallucinating and hearing the voices of Satan. Boyd is inspired by obselete technology, celebrity iconography, and do-it-yourself comic book culture. In addition to creating paintings, namely portraits, Boyd also makes lo-fi videos.

Journal Nov. 22, 2019 - Serving the People
Journal Nov. 22, 2019
Andy Heck Boyd
Cassette tape
Untitled (Nirvana 1993, ADR), 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled (Nirvana 1993, ADR), 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Cassette tape
I got the soda can blues, 2020 - Serving the People
I got the soda can blues, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Color pencil on cardstock 
4.25h x 4w in
10.79h x 10.16w cm
Dumped out the remainder of campbells tomato soup, 2020 - Serving the People
Dumped out the remainder of campbells tomato soup, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Color pencil on cardstock 
4.25h x 5.5w in
10.795h x 13.97w cm
MR Ba-boo, 2020 - Serving the People
MR Ba-boo, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Color pencil on cardstock 
4h x 4.25w in
10.16h x 10.79w cm
Untitled, 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Color pencil on cardstock 
4.25h x 5.5w in
10.79h x 13.97w cm
Untitled, 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Color pencil on paper 
4.24h x 4w in
10.795h x 10.16w cm
Untitled, 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Color pencil on cardstock 
4.25h x 5.5w in
10.795h x 13.97w cm
Untitled, 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Color pencil on cardstock 
4.25h x 5.5w in
10.79h x 13.97w cm
Untitled, 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Color pencil on paper 
4.5h x 5.5w in
11.43h x 13.97w cm
Untitled, 2020 - Serving the People
Untitled, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Cassette tape
Retirement from Cartoons, 2020 - Serving the People
Retirement from Cartoons, 2020
Andy Heck Boyd
Cassette tape

~ Group Show 2

Black Moth, 2019 - Serving the People
Black Moth, 2019
Nick Atkins
Oil, air brush acrylic on wood with sequins
12.5 x 7.5 in
29.21 x 19.05 cm
$1,000.00
Purchase
Sun, 2018 - Serving the People
Sun, 2018
Dominic Santos
Archival pigment print
8 x 10 in
20.32 x 25.4 c
$280.00
Purchase
Demo 2, 2019 - Serving the People
Demo 2, 2019
Tremaine Emory
Velvet tapestry (found object), natural cotton wreaths (handmade by artist)
62 x 46 in
157.48 x 116.84 cm
$5,000.00

Purchase
Opening (Block 488 Lot 1), 2018 - Serving the People
Opening (Block 488 Lot 1), 2018
Andrew Kass
C-Print
10 x 8 in
25.4 x 20.32 cm
Edition of 50
$250.00

Purchase
Spitting In The Faces Of A Billion Unborn Children, 2019 - Serving the People
Spitting In The Faces Of A Billion Unborn Children, 2019
Cali Dewitt
Inkjet and acrylic on canvas
48 x 48 in
121.92 x 121.92 cm
$7,500.00

Purchase
Untitled, 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled, 2019
Nick Whiteford Photography
4 x 6 in
New York University
$1,450.00

Purchase

Instagram

Website
Nice Parking, 2019 - Serving the People
Nice Parking, 2019
Ben Werther
Crayon rubbing on Japanese paper
8 1/2 x 11
21.59 x 27.94 cm
$100.00
sold
It's Not What It Seems, 2019 - Serving the People
It’s Not What It Seems, 2019
Alexander James
Oil on canvas
39 1/3 x 39 1/3 x 1 1/2 in
100 x 100 x 4 cm
$6,000.00

Purchase
Light in The Earth, is Everywhere/Seal The Planet, 2019 - Serving the People
Light in The Earth, is Everywhere/Seal The Planet, 2019
Nick Farhi
Oil and pastel on aluminum panel
14  x 10  x .10 in
35.56 x 25.4 x 0.25 cm
$2,500.00

Purchase
How To Repulse A Demon I, 2019 - Serving the People
How To Repulse A Demon I, 2019
Heather Benjamin
Gouache and pencil on paper
14 x 20 in 
35.56 x 50.8 cm
$800.00

Purchase
Untitled (Mr. Potato Head), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Mr. Potato Head), 2019
Henry Swanson
Oil on linen
10 x 8 in
25.4 cm by 20.32 cm
$700.00

Purchase
Untitled Landscape 001, 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled Landscape 001, 2019
Danny Rose
Acrylic, enamel on canvas
6 x 6 x 1.5 in
15.24 x 15.24 x 3.81 cm
$100.00
sold
TV Song, 2019 - Serving the People
TV Song, 2019
Andy Heck Boyd
Pen on paper
5 1/2 x 9 in
13.97 cm x 22.86 cm
$100.00
sold
Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, 2019 - Serving the People
Salt, Pepper, Ketchup, 2019
Alex Stern
Acrylic on canvas
76 x 50 in
193.04 x 127 cm
$2,300.00

Purchase
Breathing, 2018 - Serving the People
Breathing, 2018
Zijuan Wang
Water-sensitive paper
11.81 x 39.37 in
30 x 100 cm
$1,000.00

Purchase
Icing 2, 2018 - Serving the People
Icing 2, 2018
Adrian Schachter
Acrylic, gesso and gel on wooden board
34 x 34 in
86.36 x 86.36 cm
$900.00

Purchase
Severe Patient, 2018 - Serving the People
Severe Patient, 2018
Miranda Yokota
Print
23 x 16 in
59 x 42 cm
$180.00

Purchase
Tucked and Buckled, 2018 - Serving the People
Tucked and Buckled, 2018
Anthony Palocci Jr
Gouache on paper
8 x 6 in
20.3 x 15.24 cm
$300.00
sold
Crescent Rain, 2019 - Serving the People
Crescent Rain, 2019
Chito
Enamel on paper
18 x 24 in
45.72 x 60.96 cm
sold
Night Fox, 2019 - Serving the People
Night Fox, 2019
Elliott Chambers
Oil on canvas
15 1/2 x 13 x 1.5
39.3cm x 33cm x 3.8cm
$1,800.00
sold
Slice, 2012 - Serving the People
Slice, 2012
Anthony Palocci Jr
Oil on canvas
30 x 30 in
76.2 x 76.2 cm
$2,500.00
sold
Night Moves, 2019 - Serving the People
Night Moves, 2019
Tarek Al-Shammaa
Oil stick and acrylic on canvas
62 x 67 in
160 x 170 cm
$6,986.00

Purchase
Baby, 2019 - Serving the People
Baby, 2019
Rex
Acrylic and ink print on paper
20 x 30 in
50.8 x 76.2 cm
$5,000.00
sold
Failures of Kindness, 2019 - Serving the People
Failures of Kindness, 2019
Anders Lindseth
Crayon on panel
8 x 10 x 1 in
20.32 x 25.4 x 2.54 cm
$1,000.00

Purchase
Hey Siri, play Black Flag, 2019 - Serving the People
Hey Siri, play Black Flag, 2019
Felix Bardy
Oil and enamel on paper
39.3 x 27.5 in
100 x 70 cm
$500.00

Purchase

Borrel, 2019 - Serving the People
Borrel, 2019
Byron Fredericks
Acrylic on ceramic terra cotta
12 x 5 in
30 x 12.7 cm
$750.00

Purchase
Seeds, 2019 - Serving the People
Seeds, 2019
Dorothea Osborn
Oil and mixed media
24 x 12 in
60.96 x 30.48 cm
$400.00
Purchase
National Lottery, 2018 - Serving the People
National Lottery, 2018
Kai Schachter
Oil, spray paint and graphite on canvas
36 x 22 in
91.44 x 22 cm
not for sale

~ 100 Strawberries by Alberto Cuadros

Untitled (Strawberry 075), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 075), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 028), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 028), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 091), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 091), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold

Untitled (Strawberry 080), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 080), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 062), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 062), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 023), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 023), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 056), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 056), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold

Untitled (Strawberry 053), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 053), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 037), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 037), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 071), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 071), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 010), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 010), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 058), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 058), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 099), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 099), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 026), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 026), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 081), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 081), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 001), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 001), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 036), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 036), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 011), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 011), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 031), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 031), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 090), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 090), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 041), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 041), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 064), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 064), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 009), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 009), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 093), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 093), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 025), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 025), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00

Untitled (Strawberry 002), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 002), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 045), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 045), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 088), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 088), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 054), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 054), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 044), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 044), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 049), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 049), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 038), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 038), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 084), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 084), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 072), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 072), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 061), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 061), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 077), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 077), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 050), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 050), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 085), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 085), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 094), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 094), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 096), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 096), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 078), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 078), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 067), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 067), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
Purchase
Untitled (Strawberry 052), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 052), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 039), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 039), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 019), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 019), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 040), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 040), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 070), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 070), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 051), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 051), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 068), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 068), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold
Untitled (Strawberry 092), 2019 - Serving the People
Untitled (Strawberry 092), 2019
Alberto Cuadros
Flashe on Canvas
9 x 12 in
$100.00
sold

~ Stand Ins by Andy Heck Boyd

Copy of Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Copy of Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic and collage on panel
14 × 11 in
$300.00
Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic on panel
10 × 8 in
$300.00
Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic on canvas
12 × 9 in
$300.00
Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic on panel
10 × 8 in
$300.00
Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic on panel
10 × 8 in
$300.00
Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic and watercolor on canvas
10 x 8 x 3/4 in
$300.00
Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic and collage on panel
14 × 11 in
$300.00
Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic on panel
10 × 8 in
$300.00
Untitled (Face), 2017 - Serving the People
Untitled (Face), 2017
Andy Heck Boyd
Acrylic and collage on panel
14 × 11 in
$300.00

~ A Line Runs Through It by Colin Mcelroy

Untitled (Fly Line 04), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 04), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00
Untitled (Fly Line 08), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 08), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00
Untitled (Fly Line 03), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 03), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00
Untitled (Fly Line 01), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 01), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00
Untitled (Fly Line 06), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 06), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00
Untitled (Fly Line 05), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 05), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00
Untitled (Fly Line 07), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 07), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00
Untitled (Fly Line 09), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 09), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00
Untitled (Fly Line 02), 2018 - Serving the People
Untitled (Fly Line 02), 2018
Colin Mcelroy
Collage on paper
9 × 12 in
$250.00

~ Rodeo Christmas by Nick Farhi

Un Brillo Cereza (Cherry Glow Study), 2017 - Nick Farhi
Un Brillo Cereza (Cherry Glow Study), 2017
Nick Farhi
Oil on canvas
30 × 24 in
$3,000.00
Sold
Cristibal Horse Barn, 2017 - Nick Farhi
Cristibal Horse Barn, 2017
Nick Farhi
Oil on canvas
20 × 16 in
$3,000.00
Not for sale
Rudolph's Pasture, 2017 - Nick Farhi
Rudolph’s Pasture, 2017
Nick Farhi
Oil on canvas
20 × 16 in
$3,000.00
Not for sale
First Pajama's", 2017 - Nick Farhi
First Pajama’s, 2017
Nick Farhi
Oil on canvas
20 × 16 in
$3,000.00
Not for sale
Neon Populist, 2017 - Nick Farhi
Neon Populist, 2017
Nick Farhi
Oil on canvas
30 × 24 in
$3,000.00
Not for sale